Go Back   Bodybuilding Forum - Bodybuilding.net > Bodybuilding Forum > Nutrition

Protein - What is it?

Nutrition discussion on Protein - What is it?, within the Bodybuilding Forum; Found this article on Protein.... Protein Protein constitutes three-fourths of our body tissue (excluding the water). Muscles, organs, antibodies, enzymes, ...


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-16-2006, 03:53 PM   #1
Septooth
Rank: New Member
Experience: > 1 Year
 
Septooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 34
Country:

Gender:
Default Protein - What is it?

Found this article on Protein....


Protein
Protein constitutes three-fourths of our body tissue (excluding the water). Muscles, organs, antibodies, enzymes, and some hormones are largely composed of proteins. Other key body functions include tissue repair, fluid balance, blood clotting, and vision.
What is protein?

Protein is not a single substance but numerous chemical combinations. The basic structure of protein is amino acid chains, which can form many different configurations and can combine with other substances. There have been 22 amino acids identified in the protein of the human body. Proteins are constantly broken down in the body. Most of these are reused by the body. However, some need to be replaced. There are nine that are considered to be essential. These cannot be manufactured by the body and must be supplied by the diet.

How much protein do you need?

The average protein requirement for women is 50 grams per day and 60 grams per day for men. Meat and other animal products are the most readily available sources of complete protein. The protein content of cooked meat and dairy products is between 15% and 40%. In contrast, cooked cereals, beans, lentils, and peas range from 3% to 10%. Vegetarians can get enough protein if they eat a well-balanced diet of grains and vegetables, like brown rice, whole wheat pasta, soy products, and beans.

What are good sources of protein?

Eggs, milk, fish, beef, peanuts, oats, rice, whole wheat products, corn products, soybean products, sesame seeds, peas, and beans are all good sources of protein.

Do high protein diets help people gain muscle mass?

You need adequate protein to build muscle, but if 10-15% of your diet is protein, you are getting enough to maintain and add new muscle and tissue. It is a myth that super-high protein diets assist in increasing lean muscle mass or give athletes a competitive edge. Any excess protein will be stored as fat, not muscle. Plus, the conversion of large amounts of protein to fat puts stress on both the kidneys and the liver.
Septooth is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!Share on Facebook
Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2006, 06:30 AM   #2
phreaknite
Rank: New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 41

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Septooth View Post

Do high protein diets help people gain muscle mass?

You need adequate protein to build muscle, but if 10-15% of your diet is protein, you are getting enough to maintain and add new muscle and tissue. It is a myth that super-high protein diets assist in increasing lean muscle mass or give athletes a competitive edge. Any excess protein will be stored as fat, not muscle. Plus, the conversion of large amounts of protein to fat puts stress on both the kidneys and the liver.
I think its more important to put your own body into context...i experimented a lot with my diet and my own body and I find that my body contantly craves protein (and when i look back on my past, before i even knew how to eat, i realized i always have craved proteins)

Some people's bodies are better than others. If I eat a diet with a moderate amount of fat, it easily gets stored on my body whereas I can eat 300-350g of protein a day and not have it stored as fat even if I am not working out very much...

I agree for the most part though...if you dont know how your body reacts to things it is necessary to experiment and the guidelines based on the norm are the best to follow...just keep in mind they arent rules..
phreaknite is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!Share on Facebook
Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2006, 08:27 AM   #3
triqqey
Rank: Member
Experience: > 1 Year
 
triqqey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Podunk, USA
Posts: 203
Country:

Gender:
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Septooth View Post
Found this article on Protein....


Protein
Protein constitutes three-fourths of our body tissue (excluding the water). Muscles, organs, antibodies, enzymes, and some hormones are largely composed of proteins. Other key body functions include tissue repair, fluid balance, blood clotting, and vision.
What is protein?

Protein is not a single substance but numerous chemical combinations. The basic structure of protein is amino acid chains, which can form many different configurations and can combine with other substances. There have been 22 amino acids identified in the protein of the human body. Proteins are constantly broken down in the body. Most of these are reused by the body. However, some need to be replaced. There are nine that are considered to be essential. These cannot be manufactured by the body and must be supplied by the diet.

How much protein do you need?

The average protein requirement for women is 50 grams per day and 60 grams per day for men. Meat and other animal products are the most readily available sources of complete protein. The protein content of cooked meat and dairy products is between 15% and 40%. In contrast, cooked cereals, beans, lentils, and peas range from 3% to 10%. Vegetarians can get enough protein if they eat a well-balanced diet of grains and vegetables, like brown rice, whole wheat pasta, soy products, and beans.

What are good sources of protein?

Eggs, milk, fish, beef, peanuts, oats, rice, whole wheat products, corn products, soybean products, sesame seeds, peas, and beans are all good sources of protein.

Do high protein diets help people gain muscle mass?

You need adequate protein to build muscle, but if 10-15% of your diet is protein, you are getting enough to maintain and add new muscle and tissue. It is a myth that super-high protein diets assist in increasing lean muscle mass or give athletes a competitive edge. Any excess protein will be stored as fat, not muscle. Plus, the conversion of large amounts of protein to fat puts stress on both the kidneys and the liver.


I wonder who the author is, lol. This sounds like someone read a nutrition textbook and started making assumptions.
60 grams of protein per day for a bodybuilder??? Is this guy for real? I know I would prolly feel my muscles shrinking and catabolizing at such a low amount of protein.
Apparently, these pro bodybuilders are just giant bodies of toughened fat. I mean, I don't need to look at Jay Cutler's diet to tell anyone that he takes in a bit more than 60g of protein or that a bit more than 15% of his diet is protein. According to this guy, all that extra protein is turned into fat...
I love these posts! It proves the classic cliche, "what looks good on paper doesn't always work in reality"


triqqey's Sig:"The iron never lies to you. You can walk outside and listen to all kinds of talk, get told that you're a god or a total bastard. The iron will always kick you the real deal. The iron is the great reference point, the all-knowing perspective giver. Always there like a beacon in the pitch black. I have found the iron to be my greatest friend. It never freaks out on me, never runs. Friends come and go, but 200 pounds is always 200 pounds."

-Henry Rollins
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
triqqey is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!Share on Facebook
Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2006, 10:13 AM   #4
EricT
Rank: Heavyweight
Experience: 7-10 Years
 
EricT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 6,314
Country:

Gender:
Default

It most assuredly is not a myth that bodybuilders and strength athletes need lots of protein. Even the people who set up the food pyramid recongnize that. How much may be debatable but most nutrition experts don't dispute it.

To address the oft stated kidney issue:

Ann Intern Med 2003 Mar 18;138(6):460-7
The impact of protein intake on renal function decline in women with normal renal function or mild renal insufficiency.
Knight EL, Stampfer MJ, Hankinson SE, Spiegelman D, Curhan GC.

Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 2000 Mar;10(1):28-38
Do regular high protein diets have potential health risks on kidney function in athletes?
Poortmans JR, Dellalieux O.

Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 1999 Nov;23(11):1170-7
Changes in renal function during weight loss induced by high vs low-protein low-fat diets in overweight subjects.
Skov AR, Toubro S, Bulow J, Krabbe K, Parving HH, Astrup A.

Eur J Clin Nutr 1996 Nov;50(11):734-40
Effect of chronic dietary protein intake on the renal function in healthy subjects.
Brandle E, Sieberth HG, Hautmann RE.

Am J Kidney Dis 2003 Mar;41(3):580-7
Association of dietary protein intake and microalbuminuria in healthy adults: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. "Dietary protein intake was not associated with microalbuminuria in normotensive or nondiabetic persons."

Eur J Clin Nutr 1996 Nov;50(11):734-40
Effect of chronic dietary protein intake on the renal function in healthy subjects.
Brandle E, Sieberth HG, Hautmann RE.

The evidence supporting increased protein for bodybuilding, strenght athletes, and athletes in general is way to vast for me to get into.

As far as negative effects the only definite negative effect on other wise healthy persons with a longterm high protein intake (and I mean HIGH) is increased calcium leaching from bones, especially in older women. This is worse when the protein sources are pedominantly animal in origin.

Last edited by EricT; 11-17-2006 at 10:53 AM..

EricT's Sig:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
or
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


If you act sanctimonious I will just list out your logical fallacies until you get pissed off and spew blasphemous remarks.
EricT is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!Share on Facebook
Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2006, 11:11 AM   #5
Kane
Rank: Middleweight
Experience: 3-5 Years
 
Kane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 2,238
Country:

Gender:
Default

I don't like the idea that your intake of protein is not related to your LBM, IMO that is an extremely important piece of information when looking at protein intake.

As far as the high protein diet is concerned...I need in the range of 300+ grams to see gains that are "acceptable". And I'm only 180lbs! A far cry from most pro athletes and BB'ers. So the idea of me taking in 60grams is rediculous, it wouldn't even be worth my time to go to the gym and bust my ass through a workout.

I'm glad you posted the article though, it makes everyone stop and think and helps de-bunk most myths in the process.

Kane's Sig:"Pain don't hurt" - Dalton

"NO, this is my squat rack. Go get your own!"

"Damn that's shit heavy" - Wolf


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Kane is offline  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!Share on Facebook
Reply With Quote
Reply

  Bodybuilding Forum - Bodybuilding.net > Bodybuilding Forum > Nutrition


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.