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Nutrition discussion on weight gain help, within the Bodybuilding Forum; Originally Posted by peanutman291 Steroids fuck you up in many ways..your body isn't meant to be as big as steroids ...


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Old 07-21-2006, 07:58 AM   #21
verbatimreturned
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peanutman291
Steroids fuck you up in many ways..your body isn't meant to be as big as steroids make you
Well I have news for you, your body isn't supposted to really be heavier than 180 (depending on height, gender, etc.) so I guess you better stay under that weightclass, or pick up Badminton
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Old 07-21-2006, 08:02 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by peanutman291
(Legimate search my ass..)
Peanutman do you mean to tell me that the "Committee on Military Nutrition Research, Institute of Medicine. Washington, DC" isn't a legit source!? a committee put together by our own U.S. of A.? Dont be rediculous, I can type in things into google as well that would convince you that breathing in the air outside is bad. Oh and if your going to be on your computer stand FAR away due to radiation, same thing with your cell phone.....I hope you have speakerphone or something
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Old 07-21-2006, 09:10 AM   #23
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Here's some further info as to the FDA's role in supplements:

Overview of Dietary Supplements
What is FDA's role in regulating dietary supplements versus the manufacturer's responsibility for marketing them?

In October 1994, the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) was signed into law by President Clinton. Before this time, dietary supplements were subject to the same regulatory requirements as were other foods. This new law, which amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, created a new regulatory framework for the safety and labeling of dietary supplements.

Under DSHEA, a firm is responsible for determining that the dietary supplements it manufactures or distributes are safe and that any representations or claims made about them are substantiated by adequate evidence to show that they are not false or misleading. This means that dietary supplements do not need approval from FDA before they are marketed. Except in the case of a new dietary ingredient, where pre-market review for safety data and other information is required by law, a firm does not have to provide FDA with the evidence it relies on to substantiate safety or effectiveness before or after it markets its products.

Also, manufacturers do not need to register themselves nor their dietary supplement products with FDA before producing or selling them. Currently, there are no FDA regulations that are specific to dietary supplements that establish a minimum standard of practice for manufacturing dietary supplements. However, FDA intends to issue regulations on good manufacturing practices that will focus on practices that ensure the identity, purity, quality, strength and composition of dietary supplements. At present, the manufacturer is responsible for establishing its own manufacturing practice guidelines to ensure that the dietary supplements it produces are safe and contain the ingredients listed on the label.

When must a manufacturer or distributor notify FDA about a dietary supplement it intends to market in the U.S.?

The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) requires that a manufacturer or distributor notify FDA if it intends to market a dietary supplement in the U.S. that contains a "new dietary ingredient." The manufacturer (and distributor) must demonstrate to FDA why the ingredient is reasonably expected to be safe for use in a dietary supplement, unless it has been recognized as a food substance and is present in the food supply.

There is no authoritative list of dietary ingredients that were marketed before October 15, 1994. Therefore, manufacturers and distributors are responsible for determining if a dietary ingredient is "new", and if it is not, for documenting that the dietary supplements its sells, containing the dietary ingredient, were marketed before October 15, 1994. For more detailed information on new dietary ingredients, go to: http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/ds-ingrd.html.
What information must the manufacturer disclose on the label of a dietary supplement?

FDA regulations require that certain information appear on dietary supplement labels. Information that must be on a dietary supplement label includes: a descriptive name of the product stating that it is a "supplement;" the name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor; a complete list of ingredients; and the net contents of the product.

In addition, each dietary supplement (except for some small volume products or those produced by eligible small businesses) must have nutrition labeling in the form of a

"Supplement Facts" panel. This label must identify each dietary ingredient contained in the product.

Overview of Dietary Supplements
Must all ingredients be declared on the label of a dietary supplement?

Yes, ingredients not listed on the "Supplement Facts" panel must be listed in the "other ingredient" statement beneath the panel. The types of ingredients listed there could include the source of dietary ingredients, if not identified in the "Supplement Facts" panel (e.g., rose hips as the source of vitamin C), other food ingredients (e.g., water and sugar), and technical additives or processing aids (e.g., gelatin, starch, colors, stabilizers, preservatives, and flavors). For more details, see: http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/fr97923a.html.

What is FDA's oversight responsibility for dietary supplements?

Because dietary supplements are under the "umbrella" of foods, FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) is responsible for the agency's oversight of these products. FDA's efforts to monitor the marketplace for potential illegal products (that is, products that may be unsafe or make false or misleading claims) include obtaining information from inspections of dietary supplement manufacturers and distributors, the Internet, consumer and trade complaints, occaisional laboratory analyses of selected products, and adverse events associated with the use of supplements that are reported to the agency.

Does FDA routinely analyze the content of dietary supplements?

In that FDA has limited resources to analyze the composition of food products, including dietary supplements, it focuses these resources first on public health emergencies and products that may have caused injury or illness. Enforcement priorities then go to products thought to be unsafe or fraudulent or in violation of the law. The remaining funds are used for routine monitoring of products pulled from store shelves or collected during inspections of manufacturing firms. The agency does not analyze dietary supplements before they are sold to consumers. The manufacturer is responsible for ensuring that the "Supplement Facts" label and ingredient list are accurate, that the dietary ingredients are safe, and that the content matches the amount declared on the label. FDA does not have resources to analyze dietary supplements sent to the agency by consumers who want to know their content. Instead, consumers may contact the manufacturer or a commercial laboratory for an analysis of the content.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peanut
the FDA Don't monitor all meat that comes in,but most of it.they Don't monitor bodybuilding supplements for a reason,they don't monitor crap.
Hmmm. To recap:

"Because dietary supplements are under the "umbrella" of foods, FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) is responsible for the agency's oversight of these products."

"In that FDA has limited resources to analyze the composition of food products, including dietary supplements, it focuses these resources first on public health emergencies and products that may have caused injury or illness. "

It seems that many people have this notion that the government is standing by and watching over the shoulder company manufacturing food in the U.S. It doesn't work that way. One of the central reasons for this is that it would simply be to monumental and undertaking given the limited resources. It would stand to reason that a primary reason why the FDA would like to ban certain supplements is that it would simply be easier to ban things then to investigate legitimate claims of unsafe substances or to deal with the reports of side effects of those who stupidly abuse otherwise safe ones.

Last edited by EricT; 07-21-2006 at 12:26 PM..

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If you act sanctimonious I will just list out your logical fallacies until you get pissed off and spew blasphemous remarks.
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