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Old 07-09-2009, 06:41 AM   #121
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I agree and Kane is doing a great job with this .
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Old 07-09-2009, 09:15 AM   #122
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Originally Posted by TALO View Post
I agree and Kane is doing a great job with this .
Kane always does a fabulous job explaining things. And he has the virtue of patience on his side.
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Old 07-09-2009, 09:21 AM   #123
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Originally Posted by _Wolf_ View Post
Kane always does a fabulous job explaining things. And he has the virtue of patience on his side.
Are you sure you've got the right guy? I mean, is someone else running around using the same name as me?

Thanks, guys. Its more like the virtue of not being able to let things go.

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Old 07-09-2009, 02:22 PM   #124
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The acute fatigue effects of higher rep work has a faster onset and longer dissipation time than max effort work does. So 1 rep will have less fatigue and take less time to dissipate than a set of 8
.

It depends of the kind of fatigue. If you are speaking about metabolic fatigue ok. When I speak about fatigue and overtraining, I mean nervous fatigue. A 1RM is harder than a 10RM. It's harder for the CNS because synchronization of the motor units is higher.

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I hope you realize that your max is not a static number. 95% today may be 94 or 98 another day, and if you never lift above 95% you can't say with certainty that you are at 95%.
95% is not an absolute "magical number", if you train at 94% or 96% it's ok but don't jump to 98% (over-stimulation) or go down to 91% (under-stimulation). BTW I don't find that my strength fluctuate that much. Maybe it's because I precisely know my 1RM. If I have been able to curl 28kg Monday I'll not curl 29kg thuesday not even 28.5kg. 1RM is 1RM (REP MAX, MAX EFFORT). It takes a lot of time to add 1kg on a strict unilateral curl.

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If you lift a heavier weight then you need a greater force. 95%+ is not a magical range. 95lbs and 100lbs take different forces to move, its simple physics. You try and pick up a 300lb barbell or a 305lb barbell and they will not be the same force. Buildings and bridges would fall down with your logic.
F = MA. At 95% force is maximised : Mass = 95% of the maximum and acceleration is High. At 100% mass is maximum but acceleration is lower. All in all 95% allows you to generate a maximum force for the SHORTEST time. I'm not saying it's perfect. Maybe that at 100% the Force is a little bit higher but not that much. The real difference between 95% and 100% is the Time Under Tension. Around 2 seconds at 95% and around 4-5 seconds at 100%. 2x more TUT, an effort much much higher and thus a nervous fatigue much much higher. A nervous fatigue which will accumulate and leads to strength loss.

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I dont' know where you got the 100 to 105 in 50 days being .5 every 10 days. .5 every 10 days is a 2.5lb increase at 50days. And that's a ridiculous way of looking at things. The whole point is that you know what day 1 is but you DON'T know what day 50 will be, you can hardly tell what day 3 will be like. You can't pull numbers out of the sky and say this is how it has to be or you will overtrain.
It was an example. If on Day 1 my 1RM on Floor Press = 40kg and on Day 100 my 1RM = 50kg, I can add 1kg every 10 days. The rate of increments (overload) should be adjusted to the real progression if not you'll progressively lift weights too close to your 1RM and you'll overtrain.

Iron, Talo thank you
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Old 07-09-2009, 03:02 PM   #125
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Everything here is one great big circular argument. I really want to argue the points you just made because they are about as ridiculous as everything else you've said, but I won't.

I've already devoted enough time to this journal, time I can never get back. I think its only fitting that my last post here has an obscene amount of the number 95 because it appears about 95 times in each of your posts.

I predict a 95% chance of extreme failure with your 'experiment', 91% would be too low (under failure) and 98% would be too high (over failure) but 95% is THE optimal failure percentage.

And on that note, I'm outta here. Feel free to include my prediction in your research notes.
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Old 07-09-2009, 07:03 PM   #126
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LAWL.....

Before I follow the big boss out the door, I would like to say:



and one more for the lulzz...


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Old 07-10-2009, 10:48 AM   #127
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Everyone has his beliefs and I won't change yours and you won't change mine. That's a bad situation but we can't change it.

Overtraining:

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A continuous maximal contraction is needed when lifting something very heavy, like a piano. Everyone will be aware of how rapidly fatigue can set in during such activities. In this situation the muscle machinery is going at full speed and energy is consumed at a rapid rate. In addition, the blood flow to the active muscle(s) is stopped during maximal contractions so that no delivery of oxygen (to support muscle contraction) or removal of metabolites or ions will occur. Thus severe fatigue develops within seconds and the muscle becomes rapidly weaker. Changes of the ionic distribution over the cell membrane probably contribute to this type of fatigue. Each action potential is associated with entry of sodium ions into the cell and exit of potassium ions from the cell; consequently potassium ions tend to accumulate outside of the fibres and this results in depolarization and impaired electrical activation of muscle cells. This extracellular accumulation of potassium is likely to be larger in the narrow lumen of the t-tubules from which the potassium ions can only diffuse rather slowly. This leads to impaired propagation of action potentials into the deep parts of fibres and, as a consequence,reduced Ca2+ levels and contractile activation in the central core of fibres.
Workout n7

Deadlift : 146.25
Curl L/R : 26
Floor L/R : 41

Everything was realtively easy despite an huge fatigue/stress (due to work). This week end the loads should feel lighter.

Last edited by Kinryoku; 07-10-2009 at 11:42 AM..
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Old 07-17-2009, 10:56 AM   #128
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today I tested my 1RM on floor press 24 days after the last 1RM.

Workout n14

Deadlift : 147.5
Curl L/R : 26
Floor Right : 44.5kg (+2kg in 24 days)
Floor Left : 42.5 (+0.5kg I trained too heavy and overtrained so I made nearly 0 progress).

It seems that 90% is as effective as 95% because during those 24 days I didn't increase the load enough to stay at 95% I was around 92% and despite that my progression is maximal. I made a mistake when I tried to get as close as 100% as I could. I should have continue to test the optimal load. I thought 95% was optimal but it seems it's more like 90-95% and thus I will probably soon do all my singles at 90% which will decrease the risk of overtraining to ZERO and decrease the stress on joints. I definitively don't need to warm up anymore.I'm very happy, I made good gains and if 90% is really as effective as 95% I'll have found the Optimal Load (in 2008 I extensively tested 80% and 85% but it was too light => under-stimulation).
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Old 07-23-2009, 08:41 AM   #129
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Workout n20

Deadlift : 151.25
Curl L/R : 25/24.5
Floor L/R : 40

Everything is done at 90% of 1RM, excepted the Floor Press Left Arm which is trained at 95% and will be compared to the right but I'm nearly sure that 90% is optimal. So my training is even CRAZIER than before. Instead of doing ONE REP at 95% I now only do ONE REP at 90% !!!

Easy workout ! everything went well !! Now I'll report only 1/10 workouts because they are all the same...
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Old 07-23-2009, 01:17 PM   #130
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Would you stop posting on the site?
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