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Westside 3 Day

Powerlifting discussion on Westside 3 Day, within the Bodybuilding Forum; and what's another good one for sets of five for hamstrings...keeping in mind i work out at home??? thanks for ...


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Old 07-12-2008, 09:48 AM   #21
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and what's another good one for sets of five for hamstrings...keeping in mind i work out at home??? thanks for looking
Your first ME lower supplemental really depends on a lot. If you did a deadlift (or variation) as the ME, then you could just do a type of squat to follow that up. Doesn't have to be 5 reps. I just provided a very loose example that can and quite frankly, should be interpretted a hundred different ways for a hundred different individuals.

Personally I like doing gluteham's for a few sets of 5-10's after a deadlift variation because it takes SO long to keep increasing and taking off the weight.. Menally easier I guess. Other times you could do banded GM's for sets of 10. Leg presses pyramided up (10+ reps) for you would be advisable as well. A few times I've done deadlifts followed by front squats (few sets of 5's) which worked out really well.

Again, it's whatever you can do "in the now" meaning don't try to make something nice and "neat". For example, if your lower back is fryed doing max triples GM'ing, then you aren't about to try low box squatting next even though it MAY be "scheduled" LOL.

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Old 07-12-2008, 09:51 AM   #22
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Again, it's whatever you can do "in the now" meaning don't try to make something nice and "neat". For example, if your lower back is fryed doing max triples GM'ing, then you aren't about to try low box squatting next even though it MAY be "scheduled" LOL.
right right...nothing's set in stone..i just like to have a plan............that can change
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Old 07-12-2008, 09:51 AM   #23
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Other than that, my only advice is to try what you wrote and see where that takes you. Just listen to your body and try not to do too much, too early on, for too long.
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Old 07-12-2008, 09:54 AM   #24
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thanks again dude...

i totally forgot about good mornings. did them a few times and really liked them. they will get thrown in as well.

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Old 07-13-2008, 07:45 AM   #25
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As of now I'm dabbling in some 5x5 stuff for every "Wednesday" workout (for me it's Thursday's). Whatever needs a little more work gets the volume. Of course the domino effect is that the volume will be cut short for the remainder of that day. I chose this because if you follow the rotation I'm using, the second workout every week gets an extra day of recovery in. A, B, A... B, A, B

Example:

DE Bench-

Speed Bench: 9 x 3
Banded Dips: 5 x 5
Shoulder Iso: 3 x 12 (45-60 sec rest)
Banded Triceps: 2 sets of 20

Example:

ME Squat-

Front Squat: 3 x 1 (w/ 2 sets > 90%)
Pendlay Rows: 5 x 5
Reverse Hypers: 2-3 x 8
Banded Abs ss w/ Curls

Now, the beauty of the incorperation of heavy sled dragging on days following legs is that you really don't NEED to be OCD about adding in a quad exercise like bodybuilders most likely would fret over. You can spend your legs days focusing on what matters (glutes, hammies, core work) vs. aesthetics because you know that your legs will get tons of work dragging.

I'll continue posting little augmentation things like this that may or may not apply to everyone depending on experience levels.
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Old 07-13-2008, 07:55 AM   #26
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Incorperation of Sled Dragging: Why?

1) As your GPP increases, so can your workload. You'll be able to tolerate more volume, and also can recover much faster between sets which will decrease the need for long rest times.

2) It allows for a decrease in recovery time through the process of active recovery. The faster you recover, the better the results, especially dealing with a full four day approach (preferred).

3) Prevents injuries before they happen (prehab).

4) It increases motor skill through improved efficiency of movement patterns. So what does pulling the sled mimick?

5) Intervals with the sled are awesome for fat loss.

6) Excellent for shoulder rehab. It's not just for lower body either. Buy some straps or rig your rope like I did and you could work every muscle you have. Examples: face pulls, lateral raise, rows, extensions, curls, ect.

7) Can't make it to the gym for a lower session? No problem.. Use it as a maximal effort. Just keep loading more and more weight every trip until you cannot do anymore. If you're not dead yet, take the weight off and do some walking pullthroughs. Options really are limitless.
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Old 07-13-2008, 07:55 AM   #27
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By Bryan Mann
EliteFTS.com


Many times athletes will get so caught up in the idea of trying to get stronger that they forget about everything else. They may work out every day, feel strong and think that they’re in great shape, but they can’t walk across the room without having to stop and catch their breath. This is puzzling to the athlete who has put in so many hours of training to be in “such great shape.” Many injuries happen because one variable is left out, things begin to stagnate, and soon after that the athlete gets hurt. This is where General Physical Preparedness training (GPP) often can help.

General Physical Preparedness training is not a style of training like periodization or the conjugate method; it is a component of training. “GPP training serves several functions: 1) the formation, strengthening or restoration of habits (skills) which play an auxiliary, facilitory role in sports perfectioning. 2) As a means of educating abilities, developed insufficiently by the selected type of sport, raising the general work capacity or preserving it. 3) As active rest, assisting the restoration processes after significant, specific loading and counteracting the monotony of the training. These functions define the role of the general-preparatory exercises in the athlete’s training system.” (Medvedeyev, 1988)

If a coach becomes too concerned with one aspect of training, the athletes will get out of balance and either get injured or suffer from burn out. GPP helps prevent imbalances and boredom with both specific and non-specific exercises by conditioning the body to work (Verkoshanksy, 1988). The greater the athlete’s GPP, the easier it will be for them to adapt to the exercises and demands of a sport (Bompa, 1999).

GPP work can be done many different ways. One of the most common ways is to use a weighted sled (Simmons, Tate). There are many different ways to drag a sled, and several articles have been written on the different variations on the sled, so only the basics will be discussed here.

The sled towing can be done in two different intervals, in measurements of time and distance. When dragging the sled for time, usually you will tow for two minutes in one style, rest 30 seconds, tow for two minutes in a different style, and repeat until your time is achieved (Tate). For example, tow by dragging the sled forwards for two minutes, then turn around and drag the sled while walking backwards for two minutes, then laterally for two minutes. Often times people start out dragging for about 14-15 minutes and work up to 20-30 minutes. The time doesn’t increase after you achieve the desired fitness level of dragging a weight for that amount of time, instead of increasing the amount of time, you increase the amount of weight.

Dragging for distance is done for 200 feet (Simmons), stop, rest (if the exercise will be changed, do so now) then repeat the distance. At the rest point, changing the style of dragging is optional. An athlete can change exercises each rep, as explained earlier, in the same manner as explained in time or do all reps in the same style.

If the dragging is done in place of a max effort exercise on the max effort lower day, the distance is cut down to 100 feet and more weight is used. Every trip, you will add more weight onto the sled until the sled cannot be dragged for the full 100 feet.

For many programs, a sled may not be affordable to purchase. However, they are very simple to build. But you can easily improvise instead of building one. All that is really needed is a place to add weight and a way to pull the sled. You can easily improvise a sled by using an old tire, a long piece of rope, a piece of plywood, and some weights. Lay the tire down flat and tie the rope to it. Next, place the plywood in the bottom of the tire giving it a platform a base for adding weight. Now, simply put weight in the tire, tie a rope around your stomach and go to work.
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Old 07-13-2008, 07:56 AM   #28
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Drag Your Butt Into Shape
General Physical Preparedness: Westside Style
By Dave Tate


Full Text

Many coaches and athletes don't believe in the benefits of GPP at all. Who are the worst offenders? Are you sure you want to know? Bodybuilders and powerlifters are by far the worst!. They feel that all they have to do is train the main lifts to get strong. This is why so many of them are out of shape.

I was first introduced to the concept of GPP a few years ago when Louie Simmons and I made a trip to Pittsburgh to watch John Davies train several of his athletes. John is a speed coach who was working with several players in Pittsburgh at the time. I weighed about 305 with a 2100 pound total at the time of this trip. My total was moving up but only by about five or ten pounds each competition. I knew I was missing something but didn't know what it was.

John was talking about how he'd never met an American player who couldn't benefit from added GPP. He said that just about every player he'd worked with was out of shape. American coaches, he said, were too quick to do specialized drills or movements before developing a solid base fitness level. Others athletes fail to maintain their fitness levels as they move through the ranks.

As we spoke I began to wonder if I'd lost my fitness level over the years. I'd spent the last few years force feeding myself to get my weight up and I only did those things I felt necessary in training. I didn't want to burn any more calories then I had to. At about this time we decided to go to lunch. The lunch hall was about a fourth of a mile away and up hill. John decided we would walk. Even though we could see the hall I still wanted to drive. About halfway up the hill I started to feel like I was going to die. By the time we got to the top I was soaked in sweat and beet-red. I thought my heart was going to pound through my chest. My question about GPP was answered.

My GPP was terrible and I was not only out of shape, I was way out of shape! I used to think this was how you had to be if you wanted to lift big weights. What the hell do I need to be in shape for if all I have to do is lift a weight that takes three to five seconds to complete? On the way home Louie and I came up with a plan. We knew endurance training (bike, treadmill, etc.) wasn't the ticket because it wasn't bringing up any weak points and not specific enough to our sport. We had to find a way to increase GPP while bringing up weak points.

The Solution: Sled Dragging

I decided to add in sled dragging six days a week with a few extra workouts. Louie had been doing these extra workouts for about a year and I just dismissed them as a waste of time. But the dragging sled could be used as a means of increasing work capacity. The use of a sled has many benefits:

- The sled is easy to use and doesn't require a special trip to the gym.

- The sled is specific to the development of the special skills necessary for maximal strength. (And by the way, we never run with the sled.)

-Many movements can be trained with the sled, some of which are listed below. There are movements for the abdominals, shoulders, hamstrings, etc. Virtually every muscle can be trained with a sled.

- The sled is a great way to induce active restoration. In many of the upper body dragging movements, the eccentric is eliminated because of the nature of the sled. This in turn is great for recovery because the tearing down of the muscle is much less in concentric-only movements.

I've presented just some of the possible GPP and restoration movements. It's worked wonders for us at Westside and for the athletes I train. The added GPP and hamstring development has improved many of our deadlifts and the upper body work has helped more shoulder problems caused by overtraining than anything else we've tried.
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Old 07-13-2008, 11:45 AM   #29
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heading over to the parent's later...i bet dad has got a tire in the garage...

today i tried something........"similar"....

jacked the elliptical resistance way up....8 out of 10....did 1.5 minutes as hard as i could...rest 45 seconds....back on...rest...

ended up with 9 total minutes on...and...my ass is beat. i have been off of it for seven minutes and i still have sweat dripping.

i wonder if in the winter...i could just use a cheap ass plastic sled and load it up with weight.
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Old 07-13-2008, 11:52 AM   #30
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I thought about that, but there wouldn't be any traction IMO. When I pull, I pull in beach sand at my neighborhood playground.

Instead, start looking around at local scrap yards for something usable. Or some welder that could hook you up. I tried contacting quite a few welders in my area and all of them were over the $150 mark for the cost of materials plus time. Bullshit. I have a contact in my area named Sandblaster who said he'd let me take one off his hands for $80.. That's the absolute best I could find.. But, that's not saying you could find the materials yourself at a scrap heap and just have them work on it.

For now I just have a truck tire, rope, and a paint can filled with some of that beach sand to put inside it.. No problems here.
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