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Stretching and Flexibility

Training Articles discussion on Stretching and Flexibility, within the Articles; [FONT=Verdana] by Brad Appleton Version: 1.42, Last Modified 98/06/10 [FONT=Verdana] Copyright (C) 1993-1998 by Bradford D. Apple Read the entire...


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Old 05-12-2006, 05:36 PM   #41
EricT
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Default Stretching and Flexibility

[FONT=Verdana] by Brad Appleton

Version: 1.42, Last Modified 98/06/10


[FONT=Verdana] Copyright (C) 1993-1998 by Bradford D. Apple

 

Last edited by EricT; 05-12-2006 at 05:50 PM..
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  #40  
EricT on 11-03-2008, 03:59 PM
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Here is a doc on compensation patterns. It can help with self assesment and give an idea of what may need to be stretched versus what may need to be strengthened. Don't necessarily go by the exercises listed though. Keep in mind that sometime "strengthening is more "acivating" and this can be done at different times but a good plan is to put it at the beginning of the warmup as part of dynamic mobility.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Compensation patterns.pdf (30.7 KB, 6 views)
File Type: doc Tonic Muscles.doc (25.0 KB, 2 views)
File Type: doc Janda's cross.doc (111.5 KB, 3 views)

Last edited by EricT; 11-09-2008 at 04:07 PM..
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  #41  
jamesfresh12 on 07-25-2011, 12:53 AM
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Thanks a lot for this guide, will recommend to anyone that needs information about stretching and flexibility.
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  #42  
asparcha on 10-25-2011, 01:59 AM
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Perfectly described training, thanks for the article
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  #43  
Tmno on 10-26-2011, 05:16 AM
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wow this is complete, almost everything there is about stretching
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build on 11-29-2011, 11:31 PM
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Flexibility is an important component of fitness and exercise tends to increase the amount of flexibility in a joint. Flexibility is also specific to the type of movement needed for a sport so it is more important for some sports than others. Cyclists, for example, require less hip flexibility than hurdles, and swimmers need more shoulder flexibility than runners. Nice resources !
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  #45  
build on 11-29-2011, 11:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricT View Post
by Brad Appleton

Version: 1.42, Last Modified 98/06/10


Copyright (C) 1993-1998 by Bradford D. Appleton

Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this document at no charge or at a charge that covers reproducing the cost of the copies, provided that the copyright notice and this permission notice are preserved on all copies.

This document is available in plain text, PDF, postscript, and html formats via the world Wide Web from the following URLs:
`http://www.bradapp.net/docs/rec/stretching/'
`ftp://ftp.enteract.com/users/bradapp/rec/stretching/'
(the file suffix indicates the file format)


DISCLAIMER

The techniques, ideas, and suggestions in this document are not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice! Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any new exercise or exercise technique, particularly if you are pregnant or nursing, or if you are elderly, or if you have any chronic or recurring conditions. Any application of the techniques, ideas, and suggestions in this document is at the reader's sole discretion and risk.

The author and publisher of this document and their employers make no warranty of any kind in regard to the content of this document, including, but not limited to, any implied warranties of merchantability, or fitness for any particular purpose. The author and publisher of this document and their employers are not liable or responsible to any person or entity for any errors contained in this document, or for any special, incidental, or consequential damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the information contained in this document.

Section: Table of Contents
**************************

All section titles in this document begin with the prefix "Section: ". If you wish, you may scan ahead to a particular section by searching for the regular expression /^Section: SECTION-NAME/. For example, to go to the unnumbered section named "Introduction", you could scan for /^Section: Intro/; to go to section 1.1, you could scan for /^Section: 1.1/; and to go to appendix A, you could scan for /^Section: Appendix A/.

This document is organized into the following sections:

Introduction
Disclaimer
Acknowledgements
About the Author

1 Physiology of Stretching
1.1 The Musculoskeletal System
1.2 Muscle Composition
1.2.1 How Muscles Contract
1.2.2 Fast and Slow Muscle Fibers
1.3 Connective Tissue
1.4 Cooperating Muscle Groups
1.5 Types of Muscle Contractions
1.6 What Happens When You Stretch
1.6.1 Proprioceptors
1.6.2 The Stretch Reflex
1.6.2.1 Components of the Stretch Reflex
1.6.3 The Lengthening Reaction
1.6.4 Reciprocal Inhibition

2 Flexibility
2.1 Types of Flexibility
2.2 Factors Limiting Flexibility
2.2.1 How Connective Tissue Affects Flexibility
2.2.2 How Aging Affects Flexibility
2.3 Strength and Flexibility
2.3.1 Why Bodybuilders Should Stretch
2.3.2 Why Contortionists Should Strengthen
2.4 Overflexibility

3 Types of Stretching
3.1 Ballistic Stretching
3.2 Dynamic Stretching
3.3 Active Stretching
3.4 Passive Stretching
3.5 Static Stretching
3.6 Isometric Stretching
3.6.1 How Isometric Stretching Works
3.7 PNF Stretching
3.7.1 How PNF Stretching Works

4 How to Stretch
4.1 Warming Up
4.1.1 General Warm-Up
4.1.1.1 Joint Rotations
4.1.1.2 Aerobic Activity
4.1.2 Warm-Up Stretching
4.1.2.1 Static Warm-Up Stretching
4.1.2.2 Dynamic Warm-Up Stretching
4.1.3 Sport-Specific Activity
4.2 Cooling Down
4.3 Massage
4.4 Elements of a Good Stretch
4.4.1 Isolation
4.4.2 Leverage
4.4.3 Risk
4.5 Some Risky Stretches
4.6 Duration, Counting, and Repetition
4.7 Breathing During Stretching
4.8 Exercise Order
4.9 When to Stretch
4.9.1 Early-Morning Stretching
4.10 Stretching With a Partner
4.11 Stretching to Increase Flexibility
4.12 Pain and Discomfort
4.12.1 Common Causes of Muscular Soreness
4.12.2 Stretching with Pain
4.12.3 Overstretching
4.13 Performing Splits
4.13.1 Common Problems When Performing Splits
4.13.2 The Front Split
4.13.3 The Side Split
4.13.4 Split-Stretching Machines

Appendix A References on Stretching
A.1 Recommendations
A.2 Additional Comments

Appendix B Working Toward the Splits
B.1 lower back stretches
B.2 lying buttock stretch
B.3 groin and inner-thigh stretch
B.4 seated leg stretches
B.4.1 seated calf stretch
B.4.2 seated hamstring stretch
B.4.3 seated inner-thigh stretch
B.5 psoas stretch
B.6 quadricep stretch
B.7 lying `V' stretch

Appendix C Normal Ranges of Joint Motion
C.1 Neck
C.2 Lumbar Spine
C.3 Shoulder
C.4 Elbow
C.5 Wrist
C.6 Hip
C.7 Knee
C.8 Ankle
Flexibility is an important component of fitness and exercise tends to increase the amount of flexibility in a joint. Flexibility is also specific to the type of movement needed for a sport so it is more important for some sports than others. Cyclists, for example, require less hip flexibility than hurdles, and swimmers need more shoulder flexibility than runners. Nice resources !......
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