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Training discussion on Alternative to deadlift?, within the Bodybuilding Forum; Yeah..do what pity said. I would, for now, stick to the risk circles and basically just moving the wrists pre-workout ...


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Old 12-26-2008, 04:43 PM   #11
EricT
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Yeah..do what pity said.

I would, for now, stick to the risk circles and basically just moving the wrists pre-workout but simple replace the "stretching" with the tennis ball work. And that is basically what self myofascial release is. You can use your own hands, also, of course. It's a bit more than just a massage, though, and would be more like poor man's deep tissue work..like ART (active release therapy).

The problem with stretching is that it sometimes can do more harm than good.

I'll try to put it in really simple terms. If you have a lot of knots and adhesions and scar tissue in the fasica, etc...stretching can just make that worse..make the soft-tissue problem worse.

Look at it this way. Tie a rubber band in a not. What happens to that not if you then "stretch" the rubber band? Does it relax, loosen, and go away? Of course not. It tigtens, right? Well you can think of these soft tissue restrictions the same way when your stretch the muscle.

Given the stretching may feel good when your doing it or may make you pain temporarily better but it is dong more harm in the long run.

I don't know that stretching, in this case is the wrong thing to do BUT I feel very confident that the SMR will work better and not hurt you. If you can improve soft tissue quality you may see a lot of relief.

The welding makes sense. I have a trainee whose a painter with similar problems and we are going to do SMR on his forearms and wrists and just mobilization for the wrists.

There are some posts and links somewhere on the forum about SMR that I will post up when I find them or if not, I'm sure Pity will.

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If you act sanctimonious I will just list out your logical fallacies until you get pissed off and spew blasphemous remarks.
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:14 PM   #12
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Last edited by Pitysister; 02-26-2009 at 08:49 AM..
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Old 12-27-2008, 08:38 AM   #13
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I'm not sure if he's still offering that, Pity. I haven't been able to locate it in the newsletter links.http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=475832

Probably a bit more introductory info but basically the same stuff as in Max Strength.

And I posted the foam roller video series (cressey and Gentilcore) earlier in Wolf's journal if you or your trainer want to see it in action.

Oh, I forgot about this one from Mike Boyle:

http://www.strengthcoach.com/public/1303.cfm

And this last thing I will just post the beginning of this article without the exercises since they are the same old thing. This is a really cool explaination not only of foam rolling but how injuries occur in the first place:

Self-Myofascial Release Techniques

Micheal Clark, MS, PT, PES, CSCS

Alan Russell, ATC, NASM-PES, CSCS


Would you believe that your client’s function could be improved for less than $20?

Sound too good to be true? By performing Self-Myofascial Release techniques on a simple piece of foam, your clients can improve flexibility, function, performance, and reduce injuries. In a nutshell, your clients use their own body weight to roll on the round foam roll, massaging away restrictions to normal soft-tissue extensibility. And your clients can perform this program at home, maximizing their recovery time.


KINETIC CHAIN CONCEPTS

For the health and fitness professional to understand how this “magical” foam roll does all that, a basic understanding of the kinetic chain must be acknowledged. The kinetic chain is made up of the soft tissue system (muscle, tendon, ligament, and fascia), neural system (nerves and CNS), and articular system (joints)6. The kinetic chain works as an integrated functional unit. All components of the kinetic chain exist interdependently. If one segment is not functioning efficiently, then the other components must compensate, leading to tissue overload, fatigue, faulty movement patterns, and finally initiates the Cumulative Injury Cycle3,5,10,12. For example, muscle tightness restricts the range of motion that a joint may be moved. Because of muscle restriction (tightness, soft tissue adhesions, and neural-hyperactivity), joint motion is altered, thus changing normal neural feedback to the CNS (central nervous system). Ultimately, neuromuscular efficiency is compromised , which leads to poor movement patterns, inducing premature fatigue and causing injury. The SMFR (Self-Myofascial Release) Program helps your clients improve muscular balance and performance.

BENEFITS OF SELF-MYOFASCIAL RELEASE4

* Correct muscle imbalances
* Joint range of motion
* Muscle soreness & relieve joint stress
* Neuromuscular hypertonicity
* Extensibility of musculotendinous junction
* Neuromuscular efficiency
* Maintain normal functional muscular length


HOW DOES IT WORK?

A simple review of neuromuscular anatomy is required to apply the neurophysiological concepts. Two basic neural receptors are located in skeletal muscle tissue. These receptors are the muscle spindle and the golgi tendon organ. Muscle Spindles are located parallel to the muscle fibers. They record changes in fiber length, and rate of change to the CNS5,9. This triggers the myotatic stretch reflex, which reflexively shortens muscle tissue, alters the normal length-tension relationship, and often induces pain1,2,5. Golgi Tendon Organs (GTO) are located at the musculotendinous junction. They are sensitive to change in tension and rate of tension change2,5,7,8. Stimulation of the GTO’s past a certain threshold inhibits the muscle spindle activity, and decreases muscular tension. This phenomenon is referred to as autogenic inhibition2,4,7,11. It is said to be “autogenic” because the contracting agonist is inhibited by its’ own receptors. Reduction in soft-tissue tension decreases pain, restores normal muscle length-tension relationships, and improves function.


GENERAL GUIDELINES

1. The health and fitness professional should be proficient in these techniques prior to client instruction.
2. Hold each position 1-2 minutes for each side (when applicable).
3. If pain is reported, stop rolling and REST on the painful areas for 30-45 seconds.
* Continuing to roll when pain is present activates the muscle spindles, causing increased tightness and pain.
* Resting 30-45 seconds on painful areas will stimulate the GTO and autogenically inhibit the muscle spindles; reducing muscular tension and will help regulate fascial receptors.
4. Maintain proper Draw-In Position, which provides stability to the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex during rolling.
5. Clients can perform SMFR Program 1-2 x daily.
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Old 12-28-2008, 07:48 PM   #14
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Hey, once again, thanks for all of the information. I did find some straps. Between them and the gloves I use I am able to pull the weight with minimal pain.

On my forearms I found that using a ball that is smaller than a tennis ball works great. It hurts like hell for a bit, but with a golf ball I am able to dig pretty deep.
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Old 12-28-2008, 08:00 PM   #15
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Be cautious with starting with something so hard. And try to work up the pressure over a period of time. I mean days and weeks.

But good point that a tennis ball may be a bit too large for the forearm. Hard to get to the details. But maybe you can find something smaller but less firm than a golf ball. Digging around with something that hard is going to hurt even if you have good soft tissue quality so it's maybe not such a good indicator.

I'd stick to a tennis ball until you can figure out something a bit softer than a golf ball. There are probably specific products you can buy but usually something can be found for this stuff.
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Old 12-28-2008, 08:27 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricT View Post
I'd stick to a tennis ball until you can figure out something a bit softer than a golf ball.
A Ping Pong ball might work, they're not as hard as a golf ball. You could also hit the toy aisle of wal-mart and look around for a bouncy ball or a kids toy along those lines.

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