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Grip strength question

Training discussion on Grip strength question, within the Bodybuilding Forum; Currently when I deadlift I use a double pronated grip for as long as I can before switching to an ...


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Old 07-09-2008, 05:12 PM   #1
Chris SP
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Default Grip strength question

Currently when I deadlift I use a double pronated grip for as long as
I can before switching to an alternate grip for my work sets.
I then switch which hands are pronated/supinated so I don't develop imbalances.

My question is is this the best grip to use for strengthening?
I have some experience using a hook grip too, is that a better bet?

I've been inspired to try it after seeing this 836lb deadlift using a hook grip:


In the video comments he states: "I use the hook grip cause its better for the biceps, the back and to avoid great tensions in my back, my shoulders and my neck."

I'm not sure if his reasons are true, but with a lift that strong he's obviously doing something right.
What do you guys think?
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Old 07-09-2008, 06:59 PM   #2
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what exactly is a hook grip? I think that might be the kind of grip that i use.
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Old 07-09-2008, 08:24 PM   #3
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A hook grip doesn't address grip strength at all IMO. It's what olympic lifters use since they cannot use straps. Really it's the only way to hold onto a lot of weight with a double overhand..

Eric is much better suited to help you out with your grip.. He'll be here any day now.

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Old 07-10-2008, 09:27 AM   #4
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Strengthening your grip is a pretty wide array of topics, truthfully. When we talk about grip strength we talk about a few different things: crushing, supporting and pinching.

Crushing is what you have when you close a gripper. It isn't the same thing as supporting, like holding a barbell. Lastly you have pinching, which is very heavily dependant upon the strength of your thumb. The others... not so much.

Hook gripping has you wrap your hands around the barbell, then overlap your thumb with (typically) your first and middle finger, though there are variations on this. Try it some time, hurts like hell. I suppose you get used to it, but it replaces a strap with your thumb... I've played with it a bit, but in all honesty I don't see the benefit in hooking while deadlifting.

mixed gripping, one hand over and one under, might take some getting used to, but for the vast majority of trainees it is the best possible method to grip more weight without straps. In a dual overhand grip the bar tends to roll. At some point this happens to everyone... however if you hook, there is nowhere for the bar to roll to, as your thumbs are strapping the bar in (did I say OUCH earlier? ) In a mixed grip the bar is stopped from rolling by the opposition of the hand. Simple solution.

The other thing you can do is simply use straps. go without as long as you can, then switch to using straps. If you are not planning on competing in powerlifting, I simply can't see a reason to avoid straps. If you want to train grip, train grip. The DL isn't really going to train your grip.
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Old 07-10-2008, 09:33 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew.cook View Post
The DL isn't really going to train your grip.

I absolutely disagree with this.

If you train double overhand grip while deadlifting heavy weights your forearms will be worked...hard. Lift as many reps as you can with double over and then when you feel it starting to fail, switch to a over-under style.

Your grip will be trained. How could it not be?

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Old 07-10-2008, 09:37 AM   #6
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If you want to train grip, find/make a thick bar. I converted one barbell of mine to a thick bar using schedule 40 PVC. Cheap and effective, and SLICK! Which is good as it forces you to really squeeze the bar. An even easier solution would be to buy a small piece of PVC 2" will be perfect, run a loop of rope/chain through it and hang weights from it. Bam, ghetto grip trainer! Load it up and see how much you can pull. Thick bar work translates VERY well to smaller diameter bars.

Pinch gripping is easy too. You can simply pinch plates together (worthless if plates are rubberized as they will stick and kinda defeat the purpose). Alternatively you can make a thicker block by nailing some small pices of 2x4 together and screing a hook in the bottom by which you can suspend weights.

I doubt there is any way to make a ghetto grip trainer. However, Ivanko makes a very nice spring loaded variable resistance grip trainer that is slightly more than one Captains of Crush gripper, and will give you everything from "grandma's fart will close this thing" to "might break the Hulk's knuckles" and all inbetween in fairly manageable steps.
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Old 07-10-2008, 09:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iron_worker View Post
I absolutely disagree with this.

If you train double overhand grip while deadlifting heavy weights your forearms will be worked...hard. Lift as many reps as you can with double over and then when you feel it starting to fail, switch to a over-under style.

Your grip will be trained. How could it not be?

IronWorker
Saying that DL is good for grip training is like saying curls are good for the lower back because you have to stay tight to counter balance the weight...

Trust me, anyone that knows about grip training will NEVER tell you to just go dead lift. It isn't sufficient. In fact, I would say rock climbing is FAR superior as a grip trainer, but it doesn't make much sense to prescribe that either.
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Old 07-10-2008, 10:13 AM   #8
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Towel hangs can help the grip, too.
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Old 07-10-2008, 10:38 AM   #9
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Quote:
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Towel hangs can help the grip, too.
Yes, but this touches on something else as well, that being VB or vertical bar grip.

I talked about rock climbing earlier, and this typically uses open hand, or fingertip grip strength... something different again. There are MANY ways to train grip, or specific aspects of gripping. There are different tools and implements to train grip in these different ways.
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Old 07-10-2008, 02:09 PM   #10
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nope i dont use a hook grip
for grip strenght have you ever tried tennis ball pulls. I did them after seeing this and they are pretty nasty
upshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yo7aFkmyysc
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