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Training discussion on Hypertrophy-Specific Training, within the Bodybuilding Forum; I'm actually outlining my next HST cycle now 0311, I'm going to use it to continue my cutter. I will ...


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Old 12-20-2005, 08:01 AM   #11
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I'm actually outlining my next HST cycle now 0311, I'm going to use it to continue my cutter. I will be cutting down my time between sets to more for a circut training effect. I think it will be benificial to use this on a cutter, mainly because you are not working to failure (and at below main cals, its tough to go all out).

to that end, I may keep the 2 weeks of 15's to facilitate more fat burning, what do you think 0311?

I'll post up a spread sheet of what my projected workout will be later today.

EDIT: after reading through your spead sheet 0311, i'm simply going to stick to your plan, but I will switch up certain movements. olympic squats to hack squats, ect ect. but for the most part it will be unchanged.

Last edited by hrdgain81; 12-20-2005 at 08:08 AM..

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Old 12-21-2005, 04:49 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hrdgain81
to that end, I may keep the 2 weeks of 15's to facilitate more fat burning, what do you think 0311?
I agree. The high reps in addition to very short rest periods could be very beneficial. You could also add in some carb cycling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hrdgain81
EDIT: after reading through your spead sheet 0311, i'm simply going to stick to your plan, but I will switch up certain movements. olympic squats to hack squats, ect ect. but for the most part it will be unchanged.
So far my brother loves it. It's a nice reward to add in some extra isolations with the lower the rep range. I'd recommend possibly doing your hack squats for the 12's, but moving to A2G for the rest. That's why I don't include any direct hamstring/glute work. If you are only doing hacks, think about adding a hammie exercise in there.

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Old 12-21-2005, 06:00 AM   #13
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yeah i'll have to add some leg curls or something. I dont want my inexsperience with A2G squats hold me back from pushing the wieghts I should be. I think that may hinder my hypertrophy gains.

in the future I will work on A2G's, i hate having a weakness, or a lagging in my training. Thats one weak in the chain that will eventually need to become a strength.
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Old 12-28-2005, 03:54 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by hrdgain81
in the future I will work on A2G's, i hate having a weakness, or a lagging in my training. Thats one weak in the chain that will eventually need to become a strength.
You should really look into doing 4 weeks of the 5x5 I'm doing. It'll most definately bring up those A2G squats for you. Before I started it back around the summer time, I was only just getting into A2G squats. I'll tell you though, doing them three times a week will really get you loving them! Maybe you won't have to do the exact program, but maybe begin each of your three workouts a week with the layout I'm doing:

Monday: A2G (5x5) same weight
Wednesday: A2G front squats (5x5) same weight
Friday: A2G (1x5) pyramid to max set

It'll take you maybe 15 minutes tops to do this before you begin whatever you're on. I personally found all my subsequent lifts got stronger after doing these first in my routines.

Just something to think about.
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Old 01-03-2006, 11:23 AM   #15
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http://www.savefile.com/files/2783179

There we go...A precious upgrade from the last one!
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Old 01-08-2006, 03:29 AM   #16
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I've been researching on this a bit and Bryan Haycock over at the meso board was saying that a very effective way to increase your 5 RM weeks after you already cannot progressively load any further is to increase the sets. Of course to do this, you'd have to drop an exercise or two, keeping only the best ones. At least this way you'll increase TUL to continue growing. I'd personally rather milk the 5's for all their worth rather than do negatives. Not like I could do them anyways since I always fly solo.

Just posting this as food for thought....

Here's an example:

- 2 weeks of the 5 rep mesocycle...
- Gained some strength and was able to extend for another week...
- Hit your 5 RM for every exercise at the end of that third week....
- Added another set for the major lifts, dumped the minor ones OR at least deducted a set or two....
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Old 01-25-2006, 03:16 PM   #17
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Here's some study's done that show no significant difference in doing 1 set per exercise vs. multiple sets. Whole writeup is found here

"A low volume program, one set of each exercise, results in increases in muscle size and function similar to programs with two to four times as much volume."

Hass et. al. (2000) compared the effects of one set verses three sets in experienced recreational weightlifters. Both groups significantly improved muscular fitness and body composition during the 13 week study. Interestingly, no significant differences were found between groups for any of the test variables; including muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition.

During the 1980s, we conducted a much larger research project comparing the Nautilus principle of single-set strength training with two and three sets of strength exercise (Westcott, Greenberger, & Milius, 1989). The 77 subjects were experienced strength trainees who agreed to participate in a ten-week program of bar dips and chin-ups. All of the subjects were pretested for the maximum number of bar dips and chin-ups they could perform with proper technique. The subjects were divided into three training groups. Group One performed one set of bar dips and chin-ups, Group Two performed two sets of bar dips and chin-ups, and Group Three performed three sets of bar dips and chin-ups, three days per week throughout the study. The only difference between the three training groups was the number of sets performed during each exercise session.

The final study by the Pollock group (Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Supplement 30(5): S115, 1998) addresses the training experience issue. As you'll recall, some have suggested that experienced trainers might benefit from higher volume. In other words, after you've been training for a while, you need increased volume to continue progressing - more is better. According to this study, those people should think anew.

The researchers recruited 40 adults who had been performing one set to muscular fatigue, using nine exercises, for a minimum of one year; average training time was six years. The participants were randomly assigned to either a one-set or three-set group; both groups did 8-12 reps to failure three days per week for 13 weeks.

Both groups significantly increased their one-rep maximum strength and endurance. There was no significant difference in the gains made by the two groups in the leg extension, leg curl, bench press, overhead press and arm curl. The researchers concluded: "These data indicate that 1 set of [resistance training] is equally as beneficial as 3 sets in experienced resistance trained adults."

Another research group, K.L. Ostrowski and colleagues, tested "the effect of weight training volume on hormonal output and muscular size and function" in experienced trainers. (Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 11(3): 148-154, 1997) Thirty-five males, with one to four years weight-training experience, were assigned to one of three training groups: one-set, two-sets, or four sets. All participants did what I would call a periodized routine; they changed the rep range every few weeks. They did free-weight exercises four times a week for ten weeks using 12 reps maximum (week 1-4), 7 reps max (week 5-7) and 9 reps (week 8-10). All sets were performed to muscular fatigue with three minutes rest between sets. The only difference between the three programs was the number of sets.

As in the Pollock group studies, no significant differences in results were found. The authors concluded: "...A low volume program ... [one set of each exercise] ... results in increases in muscle size and function similar to programs with two to four times as much volume."
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Old 01-25-2006, 03:18 PM   #18
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The researchers found almost identical increases in upper and lower body thickness for both the one-set (13.6%) and three-set (13.12%) groups. Increases in one rep maximum were also essentially the same, for all five exercises, but the principle of specificity asserted itself on one exercise when it came to maximum reps or endurance. Both groups showed significant across-the- board increases in endurance, but the 3-set group showed significantly greater improvement in the bench press. At 25 weeks, the one-set group averaged 22 reps in the bench press compared to 27 for those doing 3-sets.

The third 6-month study by the Pollock group (Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Supplement 30(5): S163, 1998) focused on increases in knee-extension strength in three different modes: one-rep max, isometric peak torque and training weight. Again, there was no significant difference between the one-set and three-set groups. One-rep max increased 33.3% and 31.6% for 1 set and 3 sets, respectively; isometric increases were 35.4% versus 32.1%; and training weight increases were 25.6% compared to 14.7%

Even though the researchers apparently didn't find it significant, note that the one-set group gained slightly more strength in the first two modes and substantially more in training weight (25.6% versus 14.7%). It seems to me that specificity is at work again. When you do only one set there's nothing to keep you from doing your absolute best; but when you plan to do three sets it's natural to hold back and pace yourself. I believe that's probably why the one-set group gained more strength. They triggered more muscle fibers than the 3-set group, where pacing probably reduced intensity somewhat.

The fourth study by the Pollock group (Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Supplement 30(5): S274, 1998), also 6 months long, showed significant increases in circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in both one-set (34%) and three-set (30%) groups
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Old 01-25-2006, 03:41 PM   #19
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Hypertrophy Research - Training Frequency

Written by Daniel Moore and Ron Sowers
Wednesday, 26 October 2005

Training Frequency

Training frequency is a much debated and apparently, variable part of training. Multiple aspects of recovery and adaptation are blended together, such as rest, sleep, mental state, nutrition, age, and immune function. Prescribing a fixed and/or perfect frequency is thus very difficult. What is usually needed is a conditional prescription. i.e. If a person pays close attention to all controllable factors, rest, sleep, diet, etc. a general recommendation can be made.

Another point of consideration is optimal vs. workable. It's obvious that more equally productive sessions per time period will result in faster progress. Adjustments in the program may also be considered as a variable. A trainee may choose to alter the intensity and/or duration of training sessions while keeping a fixed frequency, or, they may adjust frequency while keeping a fixed intensity and/or duration. Both sides have 'logical' reasoning for each action. What is superior has not been proven.

What science has to say

Busso (1) compared training frequencies of 3d vs 5d per week. The conclusions were that 5d per week led to a higher level of fatigue and thus a longer recovery time. Obviously, the subjects were not recovering between sessions. If one is training in a 'single factor' model, the goal is to replicate a 'stimulation -> rest -> recover -> adapt' scenario before a subsequent stimulation is induced.

DeMichele (2) Tested rotational torso strength gains between 1d, 2d, and 3d per week subjects. No difference between 2d or 3d per week were found, but both 2d and 3d were superior to 1d per week.

Carroll (3) tested strength and MHC gains in the leg muscles for 2d vs. 3d per week training. In this study, results were similar but higher strength gains were seen in the 2d per week subjects. Other work (4) by some of the same researches earlier had shown that 3X week training for 12 weeks increased increased arm girth (5%) and forearm extensor strength (39%), associated with the triceps brachii muscle.

Significant changes in hypertrophy have been seen using various training frequencies. Abe (6) used a 3X weekly protocol, Staron (5,7) used 2X weekly both training programs produced significant increases in mass. Hakkinen (8) also used a 3X weekly approach but divided the daily volume into two daily sessions. No systematic changes took place in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the quadriceps femoris muscle or in maximal voluntary isometric strength of the leg extensor muscles over training period I with one daily sessions. However, a significant (p < 0.05) enlargement in the cross-sectional area of the muscle occurred during period II. Both phases where 3 weeks in length and this could account for not seeing changes in the initial phase simply too short of a duration to see any change but we will discuss this in our “Duration” section.

Looking at exercise frequency in older adults, Taafe(9) shows that training more frequently than one time per week had little impact compared to higher frequencies (2 or 3 times per week). Using three sets of eight exercises targeting major muscle groups of the upper and lower body, at 80% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM) for eight repetitions, muscle strength and lean body mass increased in the exercise groups relative to control, with no difference among frequency groups at any measurement interval.

Too much, too little too late?

One last consideration is recognizing over training. There are two ways the term 'over training' appears to be used.

Training more often than optimal, with no ill effect

Training more often than optimal, with ill effects (over training syndrome)

The latter is usually seen in high caliber athletes, and over a longer period of training time. The common ground being, the former will or could lead to the latter. Many researchers are looking at the over training syndrome and some new light is being shed on it. Smith (10) puts forth a hypothesis that over training compromises immune function, leading to a signaling of the CNS. This signaling generally leaves one feeling lack luster, depressed, or other feelings of malaise.

The 'take home' message

If one is willing, and/or able, to adjust the factors needed for proper recovery, and are a healthy adult, twice weekly training per muscle or muscle group appears to be the optimal prescription. Superior results have not been found for higher frequencies of stimulation (in longer term situations), but lesser results have been found for lower frequencies.

A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link, and results are the final proof of a program. Intelligent trainees will note progress, and adjust factors such as sleep, nutrition, and the like, so that recovery and adaptation may take place at the fastest pace. If a factor is unalterable, and progress cannot be made with an optimal frequency, the trainee must then, decide to either adjust the amount of work or the training frequency (11-13).

Daniel Moore and Ron Sowers www.hypertrophy-research.com

(1.)Busso, T. Effects of training frequency on the dynamics of performance response to a single training bout. J Appl Physiol. 2002 Feb;92(2):572-80.

(2.)DeMichele, PL.Isometric torso rotation strength: effect of training frequency on its development.Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1997 Jan;78(1):64-9.

(3.)Carroll, TJ. Resistance training frequency: strength and myosin heavy chain responses to two and three bouts per week.Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1998 Aug;78(3):270-5.

(4.)Jurimae, J. Changes in the myosin heavy chain isoform profile of the triceps brachii muscle following 12 weeks of resistance training.Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1996;74(3):287-92.

(5.)STARON, R. S., Skeletalmuscle adaptations during early phase of heavy-resistance training in men and women. J. Appl. Physiol. 76:1247–1255, 1994.

(6.) ABE, T. Whole body muscle hypertrophy from resistance training: distribution and total mass Br J Sports Med 2003;37:543-545

(7.)STARON, R. S. Muscle hypertrophy and fast fiber type conversions in heavy resistance-trained women. Eur.J. Appl. Physiol. 60:71–79, 1989.

(8.) H¨AKKINEN, K. Distribution of strength training volume into one or two daily sessions and neuromuscular adaptations in female athletes. Electromyogr. Clin. Neurophysiol.34:117–124, 1994.

(9.)Taafe, D. Once-weekly resistance exercise improves muscle strength and neuromuscular performance in older adults.J Am Geriatr Soc. 1999 Oct;47(10):1208-14.

(10.)SMITH, L. L. Cytokine hypothesis of overtraining: a physiological adaptation to excessive stress? Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 317-331, 2000

(11.)Cronin, J. Training volume and strength and power development. J Sci Med Sport. 2004 Jun;7(2):144-55.

(12.) American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Progression models in resistance training for healthy adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Feb;34(2):364-80. Review.

(13.)Halson, SL. Does overtraining exist? An analysis of overreaching and overtraining research. Sports Med. 2004;34(14):967-81. Review.
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Old 02-15-2006, 09:36 PM   #20
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I'm posting this to show that, yes, some pro's do HST training.. Here's a quote from Blade over at the HST board...The guys name is Boris Kleine. There's a pic of him as well as the full thread about this found here: Boris Kleine

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blade
He's still doing the classical 15/10/5 - adding dropsets to 5s. With his contest schedule this fall, he extended each HST cycle somewhat to accomodate the diet. He's been doing a 2on/1off routine on a 2-split to get more neural recovery (he's pushing extremely heavy weights - 200lbs dumbells on shoulder presses are just plain HEAVY, Ronnie Coleman go home ). Some extra volume on legs, as knee problems doesn't allow him to go really heavy (well, relatively speaking). We have a "special" setup for his contest prep - some secrets need to be kept that way Still adjusting, though - he can't handle massive carbloads very well.

He will currently be doing an abbreviated routine due to a busy time schedule.

3 times per week fullbody:
3 sets bench press
3 sets shoulder press
3 sets squats
3 sets deadlifts
2 sets barbell curls
3 sets chin ups
This thread is a few years old, but that's not the point. Also, here's some of the weights he pushed back in 2003:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blade
Incline Press 575lbs x 5
Bench Press 465lbs x 5
Shoulder Press 420lbs x 5
Close grip Bench 375lbs x 5
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