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Iron Man's "Bulking Routine"

Training discussion on Iron Man's "Bulking Routine", within the Bodybuilding Forum; i WAS obsessed with Iron Man's program a few days ago.. so, incase someone is interested, i decided to make ...


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Old 04-18-2006, 07:27 AM   #1
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Default Iron Man's "Bulking Routine"

i WAS obsessed with Iron Man's program a few days ago..

so, incase someone is interested, i decided to make a SUMMARY of the program... i've run it by the man himself and its 100% true... BUT, in case someone is interested, i've posted the ORIGINAL program below my SUMMARY as well..

so, here we go with the Summary


Summary of IRON MANS BULKING PROGRAM:

Chest: Incline Bench Press
Shoulders: Over Head Press
Triceps: DeclineSkull Crushers
Back Width: Lat Pull Downs
Back Thickness: Rows
Biceps: Barbell Curls
Traps: Shrugs
Calves: Calf Raises
Quads: A2G Squats
Hams: Leg Curls


Weeks 1-3:

Monday:
1.)Chest
2.)Shoulders
3.)Triceps
4.)Traps
5.)Abs

Wednesday:
1.)Back Width
2.)Back Thickness
3.)Biceps
4.)Calves
5.)Quads
6.)Hams

Friday:
1.)Repeat Monday

Weeks 4-6:

Monday:
1.)Chest
2.)Back Width
3.)Back Thickness
4.)Shoulders
5.)Traps
6.)Abs

Wednesday:
1.)Biceps
2.)Triceps
3.)Calves
4.)Quads
5.)Hamstrings

Friday:
1.)Repeat Monday

First 6 Week Cycle:

Weeks 1-3
Warm-up 1: 15 reps
Warm-up 2: 8 reps
Set 1: 6-10 reps TF
Set 2: 3-5 reps TF
Set 3: 11-15 reps TF

Weeks 4-6
Warm-up 1: 15 reps
Warm-up 2: 8 reps
Set 1: 6-10 reps TF
Set 2: 3-5 reps TF
Set 3: 11-15 reps TF + RP + 1-3 more reps

this is the BASIC outline... every 6 weeks you take a break of 10 days (from the friday workout to the NEXT-to-next Monday workout) and then you begin this process ALL OVER again for a total of 3 times.. so its an 18 week BULK program.....

Originally Written by The Iron Man:
Here’s what you need to do with the exercises on the list above. Find your favorite basic exercises for each body part. For e.g.; let's say that lying triceps extensions are your favorite exercise for the triceps. You would perform two light warm ups sets with that exercise. The first warm up set should be around 15 reps and the second one about 8 reps. Then you would do 3 sets of lying triceps extensions in 3 different rep ranges. With the first set you want to reach momentary muscular failure in the 6-10 rep range. The second set should hit failure at 3-5 reps. The final and 3rd set of lying triceps extensions should be taken to failure in the 11-15 rep range.

Originally Written by The Iron Man:

NOTE: (15 to 30 minutes) of "CARDIO" can be performed 3 times per week on non-training days if need be. A 15 minute maximum is a good plan for those with normal metabolism-"Mesomorphs" but those with very slow metabolism-Endomorphs will want to do 30 minute per sessions. Ectomorphs should abstain from aerobics during a bulk up period. Aerobic work is not a necessity but it does provide many health benefits and helps keep body fat levels in check.

It's important to wait a full (3 minutes) between sets to allow ATP/CP levels to replenish so the most weight can be used during each set of the (basic movement). Think over-load not pump!! This will aid in bringing forth maximum size and strength. ATP: is the only fuel supply the muscles can use. CP: Stands for creatine phosphate.

NOTE: Not allowing ATP and CP levels to return to almost full capacity will throw a monkey wrench into your mass building program when heavy compound movements such as squats are being used. This is why supplemental creatine and and/or anabolic steroids provide such good results in strength when on a mass gaining diet. They aid in restoring ATP/CP levels after an intense work set. Lactic acid builds up when one moves too rapid to the next set on the very demanding "Basic Exercises". Lactic acid will destroy the bodies ability to regenerate ATP/CP. When levels of ATP are made low they trap (ANDROGEN RECEPTOR SITES) and block the signal for the body to grow. Diet and proper rest between sets has a positive affect on ATP/CP as well.

With the IRON MAN 3 day per week High Intensity Training, 3 sets are performed twice in an 8 day period. Its imperative you never work out two days in a row so the CNS can be ready for the next workout. The CNS's ability to recovery "does not" increases as we progress in our training. The stronger we get the more intensity that can be generated through lifting heavier weights, therefore making the recovery process take even longer. Steroids only compound the problem by making one stronger. MWF is optimal for off-season trainers of all stages. Leave the 5 days per week training for pre-competition or conditioning.

NOTE: A lay off is indicated every 6 weeks on the IRON MAN "HIT" for a period of 7 TO 10 days. Since training would normally be terminated on a Friday and would not be resumed until Monday of the (second-following week) when taking off the full 10. You will come back stronger and break personal records on every exercise. (FAILURE to take this lay off will bring forth burn out and chronic injuries, thus, holding you back in SIZE and STRENGTH)!!!

NOTE: I left out Deadlifts as a lower and upper back builder because I’ve witnessed several trainers blow out spinal disk performing this movement while using proper form. It destroyed their bodybuilding activities along with their life so I avoid recommending this exercise. Be careful if you choose to do them! This workout program will need to be adjusted if you incorporate Deadlifts. Partial Deadlifts would be a more affective replacement for those looking for more upper back/trap mass. But if you MUST do Deadlifts perform only (1) sets after "TRAPS" as they must always be done last!!!!

I would like to post the original program, but its REALLY REALLY long.. so, this is the thread where you can find it.. hwoever, the info above should be more than enough IMO....

here's the link:
http://www.ironmagazineforums.com/sh...ad.php?t=60704


in my next post, i'll show you his recommended diet

Last edited by _Wolf_; 04-18-2006 at 07:38 AM..

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Old 04-18-2006, 07:31 AM   #2
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Default Iron Mans Bulking Diet

ok, so this is Iron Man's Bulking Diet....

Originally Written by The Iron Man

I would like to start out with my diets suggestion by saying you've got to condition yourself to ignore the scales for gauging your off season progress because they can "NEVER" distinquish between fat, muscle, and water. What I'm trying to say is body weight doesn't mean "EVERYTHING". How you look in the mirror "DOES"!!! Using a bodyfat measuring instrument is always needed in conjunction with the scales if you want to get real with yourself and see how much weight is truly muscle and not just added fat and/or water weight.

Next I would suggest you ignore all these new so-called "Secret Mass Gaining Diet's" popping up everywhere. Jumping around from one diet to the next is a sure fire way to not succeed in adding more mass to your frame. You've got to stick with your plan long term if you expect to get the best possible results for your bodies potential.

NOTE: Long term studies have proven that the "Zig-Zag" diet plan works better than any other method out there for gaining lean muscle mass. "Zig-Zagging" your calorie intake allows periodic BMR-(Basal Metabolic Rate) adjustments to take place. Then it's easier to begin gaining muscular body weight again-and again. If you simply try going up, up, up, in weight your "BMR" never has a chance to adjust, and weight gain becomes harder and harder, until you eventually give up on gaining that extra weight you so desperately wanted.

"HOW TO INCREASE BODYWEIGHT"


On "gear" the body has a higher metabolism, increased apeptite and is screaming out for tons of protein. When training as a natural bodybuilder the added boost in the growth process ( increased protein synthesis) from AAS will not apply so less protein will be needed.


Generally speaking a natural bodybuilders protein intake will only need to be about half of those using anabolic agents. A 200 lb natural trainer could get by with 200 grams of protein where as a drug user will need closer to 400 grams give or take a few grams. Natural trainers are only capable of absorbing so much protein. Excess intake of protein will be used as fuel not to add more muscle mass.

NOTE: CREATINE IS THE BEST LEGAL PRODUCT FOR OBTAINING MORE MUSCLE MASS. "MAXIMUM PUMP" is a product I highly recommend to natural and chemically enhanced athletes who desire that added boost in size-strength. http://www.ironmaglabs.com/maximum-pump.html

(Increasing body weight requires that (natural trainers) add "2 calories" per pound of lean bodyweight to their normal daily caloric intake for 4-5 days each week)-(including training days). It's best to spread these calories out into 4-6 meals per day. For e.g: let's say you have a 200-pound "natural" bodybuilder who is around 12% body fat and wants to add weight. They should add around 350 calories per day to his or her diet. (Bodybuilders who are "chemically enhanced" may need to add "3" calories" per day, totalling 510-700 extra calories each day). On the remaining 2-3 days each week ( including off days), one should reduce their calorie intake by "2-3" calories depending on whether or not they are natural trainers.


NOTE: Caloric intake will need to be adjusted upwards monthly to in regards to your new caloric needs because of an increase in muscle mass.



"HOW TO STAY THE SAME BODYWEIGHT BUT GAIN MUSCLE"

For 4 days each week on non-training days, reduce caloric intake by 2-3 calories per-pound of lean bodyweight and increase it by 2-3 calories per-pound of bodyweight on the 3 days you train. Adjust calories in an upward direction each month. (Elite Bodybuilders will require a (4 calorie increase per lb of lean mass) throughout the continuance of "Blitz Cycles").


Any "Bulking Phase" will results in adding bodyfat to your frame without the use of large quantities of (Growth Hormone). I realize that's probably not what some want to hear but it's true none the less. Many Competitive Bodybuilders use 10 ius of GH or more each day. These individuals actually get leaner as their weight accends. Some can eat just about anything they desire while others have to be some what stricter but the amount of body fat gained while bulking with GH will be minimal at best in comparison to those not adding GH to their AAS regimine.

How can one gain maximal muscle size with or without the use of GH and AAS? Any straight forward PRO Bodybuildier will tell you there are no miraculous diet plans out there other than ("ZIG-ZAGGING" your "CALORIC" intake.)

You will never make significant gains in muscle mass without the ingestion of the needed "Nutrients" and "Calories" to support new growth. Lean tissue is made mostly from??? PROTEIN!!! Your PTOR (PROTEIN TURN OVER RATE) will be the determining factor as to how much protein you will need on an individual basis for your bodyweight if on AAS and/or GH, SLIN, etc. PTOR for those using anabolic aids can be determined by multiplying your bodyweight x 1.818 shown in grams. So how much protein will be needed for a 225 lb "Chemically Enhanced Bodybuilder"? 225x1.818= 409 grams of protein daily.. A "Natural Bodybuilder" will have a slower (PTOR)- Protein Turnover Rate and can get by with 1 gram of protein per lb of lean muscle mass.

NOTE: If too little protein is consumed, your PTOR needs will not be met. This will put your body into a state of catabolism-"losing lean muscle tissue". Using a mixture of both fast and slow digesting protein sources is optimal, but one should keep the faster acting versions-(WHEY PROTEIN POWDER) to a lesser by using them post workout and at night along with some slower digesting proteins as your going to bed. Slower digesting proteins like (CASEIN PROTEIN POWDER) and real food should make up 75% of your protein needs. 40-70% of your total dietary intake should come from protein dependent upon your "Somatotype".

Next is Carbohydrates.They are the bodies main energy source when working in an anaerobic fashion. The low glycemic version that burn at a slow rate are best because they provide a more steady energy source with less spike in insulin. Oat fiber, brown rice, various vegetable, and maltodextrin 20 are great sources of slow burning carbs. Faster burning carbs are also needed but should be kept to a miminum and used as part of your post workout meal for the most part. Carbohydrates should make up 20-60% of daily calories dependent upon your "Somatotype".


The last category is Fats. EFA are the most important source of fats but some saturated fats are needed as well. Keep saturated fats to a minimum. Fats should make up about 10-40% of the diet dependent upon your "Somatotype."

NOTE: Keep things simple when trying to gain mass. "Mesomorphs" -(should ingest more carbs along with their protein). "Ectomorphs"- (will need more of both fats and carbs along with their protein). "Endomorphs"-( will needs lesser amounts of both carbs and fats along with their protein intake.)

Once homeostasis is reached, the ZIG-ZAG diet is the best diet plan to follow inorder to add those extra pounds of muscle mass to your frame.


____________________________ Why settle for being a man when you can be an "IRONMAN".
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Old 04-18-2006, 10:34 AM   #3
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I like the program myself. I have been using it for a few months now. Bad thing is when I take the week off it is easy to just not get back to lifting ever again. lol


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Old 04-18-2006, 10:36 AM   #4
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Quote:
ATP: is the only fuel supply the muscles can use.
Bullshit.


Quote:
Muscle Fuel: Energy Source For Muscle Contraction
Quote:
By Lee E. Brown, EdD, CSCS,*D
In order for a muscle to contract, it must have a ready fuel supply. This is best accomplished through the transfer of fuel from oxygen that is transported to the muscle through the bloodstream. The primary fuel for all muscle contraction is adenosine triphosphate or simply ATP. 1. There are three main ways that fuel is transported to the muscle and they are derived through the use of a timing or intensity system. How hard and how quickly you ask the muscle to contract will determine which fuel source is utilized.

Phosphagen System
This system provides fuel for primarily short duration, high intensity exercise 4. However, this system is active at the beginning of all exercise regardless of intensity. It works by combining ATP and creatine, which are stored in the muscle, to produce energy for muscle contraction. Yet, since the stored amounts are so low in the muscle (generally highest in fast twitch muscle fibers) this fuel source may only last as long as 10 20 seconds. 2. Requiring no oxygen for delivery, this is the primary fuel source for heavy resistance training. 5.

Glycolysis System
This is the breakdown of carbohydrates for fuel which is either stored in the muscle as glycogen or is delivered to the muscle in the blood stream as glucose 1. There are two main forms of glycolysis, fast and slow. 3. Fast glycolysis is used for times when oxygen is in short supply. Fast glycolysis results in the formation of lactic acid, the byproduct of energy supply to the muscle. 4. An increase in lactic acid in the muscle can involve muscular fatigue and ultimately cessation of exercise. Slow glycolysis is used if there is enough oxygen to allow a continuous supply of fuel. The byproduct of this form of glycolysis is pyruvate, which is not converted to lactic acid but is transported elsewhere. The end result of these two systems is that glycolysis can produce fuel for 30 seconds to a minute for moderate heavy resistance training. If continued, lactic acid would result in muscular fatigue and ultimate stoppage of the exercise. 5.

Oxidative System
This system is often referred to as the aerobic system. As you might expect, this fuel supply offers energy to the muscle through the use of continuous oxygen transport. This system works at rest and during very low intensity exercise such as repeated repetitions during resistance training for walking or running. 1. This form of energy primarily utilizes fats (70%) and carbohydrates (30%) as fuel sources, but as intensity is increased there is a switch in substrate majority from fats to carbohydrates. 3.

Glucose and glycogen are used when oxygen is present in large quantities. Enzymes can break down fats stored in cells, which can be used as a fuel source. Protein is not a significant source of fuel for muscle contraction but it can be broken down into branched chain amino acids and converted to energy. The oxidative system usually supplies energy for low intensity exercise lasting up to one and a half hours.

Summary
While all three energy systems (phosphagen, glycolysis, and oxidative) are active all the time, which system provides the majority of energy will be determined by a time based and intensity based process. Phosphagen is primarily used for 10 20 seconds, glycolysis for up to a minute, and oxidative is the primary system for all long-term exercise. For the most part, each system uses a different fuel and is specific to the relative intensity of the exercise session, with phosphagen being high intensity, glycolysis being moderate intensity, and oxidative being low intensity.

References:
  1. Baechle TR, Earle RW. (Eds). (2000). Essentials of strength training and conditioning, 2nd Ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  2. Fleck SJ, Kraemer WJ. (1997). Designing resistance training programs, 2nd Ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  3. Jones NL, McCartney N, McComas AJ. (Eds). (1986). Human muscle power. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  4. McComas AJ. (1996). Skeletal muscle. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  5. Stone MH, O'Bryant H, Garhammer J. (1981). A hypothetical model for strength training. Journal of Sports Medicine, 21:344.

Last edited by EricT; 04-18-2006 at 10:57 AM..
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Old 04-19-2006, 09:41 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anuj247
Summary of IRON MANS BULKING PROGRAM:

[/FONT] Weeks 1-3:

Monday:
1.)Chest
2.)Shoulders
3.)Triceps
4.)Traps
5.)Abs

Wednesday:
1.)Back Width
2.)Back Thickness
3.)Biceps
4.)Calves
5.)Quads
6.)Hams

Friday:
1.)Repeat Monday

Weeks 4-6:

Monday:
1.)Chest
2.)Back Width
3.)Back Thickness
4.)Shoulders
5.)Traps
6.)Abs

Wednesday:
1.)Biceps
2.)Triceps
3.)Calves
4.)Quads
5.)Hamstrings

Friday:
1.)Repeat Monday

First 6 Week Cycle:

Weeks 1-3
Warm-up 1: 15 reps
Warm-up 2: 8 reps
Set 1: 6-10 reps TF
Set 2: 3-5 reps TF
Set 3: 11-15 reps TF

Weeks 4-6
Warm-up 1: 15 reps
Warm-up 2: 8 reps
Set 1: 6-10 reps TF
Set 2: 3-5 reps TF
Set 3: 11-15 reps TF + RP + 1-3 more reps
Anuj, I know you said this routine could be a good option for my next training session but....

Is it just me or does this routine seem like ALOT of volume...I'm not an expert by any means, but 3 failure sets for each exercise seems a bit off. And the rep ranges are wierd too, 6-10, then 3-5, then 11-15...that seems pretty odd to me, 11-15, then 6-10, then 3-5 seems like it would make more sense to me

Maybe I'm wrong and horribly off on this one but this routine seems like you're heading towards overtraining...especially since you do the same workout Monday and Friday Maybe I'm missing something?

Could someone else chime in on this one please?

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Old 04-19-2006, 11:47 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kane
Is it just me or does this routine seem like ALOT of volume...I'm not an expert by any means, but 3 failure sets for each exercise seems a bit off. And the rep ranges are wierd too, 6-10, then 3-5, then 11-15...that seems pretty odd to me, 11-15, then 6-10, then 3-5 seems like it would make more sense to me
That is based on this from the full-length article.

Quote:
Given the proper form is used with each repetition- (1.5 seconds for the positive/expolsive stroke) and (2 seconds for the controlled negative), then the Type 2-"A" fibers will be stimulated by hitting failure with a weight that allows for the performance of 11-15 reps. Type 2-"B" fibers will be targeted by hitting muscular failure in the 6-10 rep range. Type 2-"C" fibers get nailed their hardest when failure is reached between 3-5 repetitions. Simply said, the ("A" fibers) work their hardest under a time load of ( 40-60 seconds). (B fibers) responds best to a time under load of (20-39 seconds). (C fibers) get nailed when it takes (1-19 seconds) to complete a set).
This is not the worst think I've ever seen but it is based on so many "assumptions" disguised as scientific fact that I don't know where to begin. The main goal seems to be "maximum intensity" but this ridiculous theory that muscle fiber rectuitment has little or no overlap is just silly.

It obviously puts the most importance on "2B", secondary on "2c", whatever they are, and third on "2A". It also assumes that everybody will recover right back to full intensity in 3 minutes based on the misinformation I mentioned above (we all have different recovery rates and always waiting 3 minutes is not a prerequisite for success), and that therefore all these different fibers will be hit with the utmost intensity. It also assumes that failure always generates maximum intesity with every trainee and therefore maximum stimulation. I could be wrong, but I don't believe this is always the case.

It also assumes that failure is necessary to "target" a muscle fiber. Which it is not. I'm not saying that failure is not a useful tool, but it is only that, a tool. It is not a prerequisite for hypertophy. Going to near failure on the first two and to momentary failure on the last is likely to be just as effective especially since it will allow you to avoid CNS overtraining and perhaps have more frequency which not everyone will be able to keep up on this program. But, like you, Kane, I am not an expert.

And as you said it seems like that would lead to overtraining. Well, the author also assumes that everyone's CNS will recover in two days or something like that. The author goes on to say that the body adapts to anything we throw at it in three weeks. Again, we know that is not true, and how long it takes your body to adapt to a certain protocol is based on many factors, one of them being training experience.

The original article was way too long and went on and on, and I got really disgusted with all the misinformation, so I didn't read all the ins and outs of it. It certainly doesn't seem like anything magical to me and when someone makes one untrue or dumb statement that makes the whole thing suspect to me.

If you look at this as more like an upper lower split then the volume does seem way high.

If I was to ignore the weird split and think of an upper/lower split then three sets per exercise isn't so much. But three sets to failure with that frequency? And the leg and back day?

But of course it is "not just another routine" it is time tested, backed up by scientific evidence (lol) and works for everyone. So there you go. You may as well give it a go, Kane. It's pretty darn similar to the stuff I started out doing, which worked at first of course but at a very low level in terms of gain. I actually found faster gains later on when I got away from the too much failure too often way of doing things. But everyone's different.

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If you act sanctimonious I will just list out your logical fallacies until you get pissed off and spew blasphemous remarks.
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Old 04-19-2006, 12:46 PM   #7
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I had completely missed the article link when I read this. I'm gonna go ahead and say that I don't buy into the hole a,b,c fibre theory. My bodybuilding common sense tells me that's bullshit. I used to train with multiple failure sets...I'd do 12 TF, then drop the weight and right away do 8 TF, drop weight again and immediately do 6 TF etc. So it was basically like one big set as there was absolutely no rest period. It did wonders for my Biceps and Pecs but nothing else. So I'm gonna pass on this program based on the fact that there are alot of better alternatives...
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