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Seng Stewart 12-18-2012 06:16 AM

Slow Training
 
I build my muscle using this method after i stopped my training for a period of time due to other commitments. Sharing here to see if it can benefit others.

To jump-start stalled results, give slow training a try: Half the weight, one-tenth the speed, half the time in the gym. Focus on the muscles, not the weights; it's a mind/muscle connection. Only 2 sets, only 6 reps each. 10 seconds for positive contraction, 10 seconds for negative contraction. No pause in the middle, no pause in the end. Stop short of locking joints and don't rely on momentum to move the weight. Don't relax. It's about the quality of your workout, not the quantity. It's about strength. Increase your weight weekly. The slower you go, the more challenged certain muscle recruitment patterns become. Slow training puts more stress on your muscles, taking them to a higher level of fatigue. You will need a Zen-like focus and a tolerance for muscle discomfit. But believe me, the time and effort you spent doing this will be well worth it.

FitnessFreek 12-18-2012 11:01 AM

Training slowly is good if you are just looking for strength. Training with normal speed builds strength (although not quite as much), explosiveness, speed, coordination, timing, balance and spatial awareness, which are very important to athletes and people in general.

aaliyahadams 12-19-2012 01:29 AM

In super-slow training, the concentric portion of each strengthening movement take a full 10 seconds to complete, and the eccentric portion takes 4-5 seconds. Athletes who engage in super-slow strength training in effect carry out their workouts in slow motion, with a heavy emphasis on coordination, form and control rather than speed.
The ideas behind lifting slow:
1.Its safer. Without bouncing or momentum, that is change of direction at speed, you’re less likely to hurt yourself.
2.It takes more strength to lift a weight slowly than quickly. A person that can do a single handstand pushup at full speed is not as strong in the movement as someone who can lower under a four count and raise up at the same.
3.It takes more control. While this is tied in to the point above, by going slow you may activate more of the surrounding musculature as it seeks to stabilize. There is no cheating by swinging into any movement.

Tricka90 12-20-2012 06:23 AM

if you have patience you start seeing result soon!

Seng Stewart 12-21-2012 08:06 AM

Agreed absolutely with FitnessFreak. The equation is really power = strength x speed. This is why body builders may be able to lift heavy weights but they will never have that explosive strength of the olympic weight-lifters.

aaliyahadams 12-24-2012 01:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seng Stewart (Post 94142)
Agreed absolutely with FitnessFreak. The equation is really power = strength x speed. This is why body builders may be able to lift heavy weights but they will never have that explosive strength of the olympic weight-lifters.

Yes that's the point!!!:WEIGHT~13:

ruelisla 08-14-2013 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FitnessFreek (Post 94095)
Training slowly is good if you are just looking for strength. Training with normal speed builds strength (although not quite as much), explosiveness, speed, coordination, timing, balance and spatial awareness, which are very important to athletes and people in general.

Correct, that's why every person or athlete on different fields should also know how to train there bodies on how to build muscles, build strength, speed, flexibility and agility.


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