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Training discussion on Squat Shoes, within the Bodybuilding Forum; Ive been looking around for a pair of these due to the bottom of my feet having been sore. Im ...


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Old 08-17-2007, 07:07 AM   #1
Diablo0125
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Default Squat Shoes

Ive been looking around for a pair of these due to the bottom of my feet having been sore. Im positive its from the squats (A2G style)and its really getting to be painful from the gym to everyday walking. The shoes i wear are pretty beat up tennis shoes so I was thinking a pair of these would help.

Can anyone recommend me a cheap pair of these...$150+ is a little steep for me at the moment. All ive found were really expensive ones unless that is considered cheap. Maybe around $60-80 would be good.

Thanks.
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Old 08-18-2007, 02:22 PM   #2
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I have no experience with this product, but this link is for shoes that are for $50. Perhaps this is what you need.

http://www.crainsmuscleworld.com/old...owershoes.html

This next link discusses high top shoes and not using bouncy shoes.

http://www.netpath.net/~bootht/pages/training/shoes.htm

Troy

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Old 08-18-2007, 04:49 PM   #3
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You may have sore feet from over-pronation. If it's from the squats it could come from a lot of lower body problems but what tends to happen is that people over-pronate to make up for a lack of range of motion. So basically you transfer more of the weight to the inside of the foot than is healthy. This can actually cause the feet to flatten as in "fallen arches". And you can get pain on different parts of the bottom of the feet.

If your knock kneed or your knees turn inward this would be a clue and you may tend to have that happen during squats.

Typically with shoes for squatting and deadlifting they have flat soles. Lot's of people like to squat in chuck taylors and they offer absolutely no support to the bottom of the foot. Not you may be a person who need some extra support but the point is that squatting in itself should not automatically necessitate this.

Maybe you should get it checked out by an orthodedists or something like that.

But I think some shoes are a good idea in general

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If you act sanctimonious I will just list out your logical fallacies until you get pissed off and spew blasphemous remarks.
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Old 08-19-2007, 09:00 AM   #4
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Hmm could this mean my form for my A2G squats is wrong? I do notice when doing a rep I push with my feet maybe using more muscles in my feet than i should. Not sure if that makes too much sense. Although your right i should probably get this checked out before i end up with flat feet or other complications.

Hard to find a doctor that understands lifting you know lol.
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Old 08-19-2007, 10:13 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diablo0125 View Post
Hard to find a doctor that understands lifting you know lol.
I agree 100%

I crashed pretty badly one December while snowboarding and jarred my knee pretty good, so when I got back into lifting I decreased the weight on squats dramatically.

A few months later I was playing tennis against a good friend of mine who is a pre-natal care doctor and my knee gave out completely. He asked what exercise I was doing besides tennis and I said I lifted weights, with squats being part of the program.

He said that squats are the worst thing for your knees, etc. "just take a look at older powerlifters. They need to wrap up their knees like mummies just to keep lifting and have the worst joints out there. Squats, in my opinion, should be used only by women because their hips are wider than men's and that makes their center of gravity lower. In my opinion, don't do squats at all."

Anyways, this was before I knew as much about lifting as I do now and I'm sure my knee gave out because I didn't rest it adequately.

Point of story: Listen to sports doctor's opinions, not pre-natal care doctor's opinions.

I lost so much poundage on my squat after taking his word at face value that I'm playing catch up right now.

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Old 08-19-2007, 12:30 PM   #6
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The idea was to see an orthodedist or maybe a podiatrist to rule out any structrural problems with the feet or what have you. For sure the lifting problems and that problem are two different issues so a doctor who doesn't specialize in sports or what have you would just be a base of information to work from.

But a lot of what doctors may call structural problems may not necessarily be congenital and stem from imbalances.

The problem with just trying to correct form is it's like asking a catepillar how it crawls. If your body is doing what it has to do through faciliatation or inhibition then you can think about it all you want but may not be able to overcome it. A person who overpronates will not necessarily be able to stop themselves from overpronating if they are not aware of the difference in the first place.

But of course you should start with being aware of proper form. You should try to push more though the heels and feel the weight over the middle of the foot rather than feeling a lot of pressure focused on one or two small parts of the foot. I don't know if that makes sense. It's hard to describe what it should be like just like it's hard for your to describe what it is like for you.

The knees should stay aligned with the feet and should not be turing inward.

Now you say you "push with your feet" and although it is important to try to drive through the heels and all that like I said before it may help you to think of it in a different way. My adage with squatting is to "relate to the bar, not to the floor". You are trying to move the bar up, not push the floor away from you! People tend to make it all about pushing downward through the knees.

Instead initiate the lift by pushing your shoulders and upper back up against the bar. In other words think simply about moving the bar up. What this will do is initiate the hips in coordination with the knee extension which is what you have to have. Believe me, this simple mental shift can make a huge differnce.

To check and work on your form you need a lighter weight. If the weight is too heavy then there is not much chance that your will be able to correct any form issues through will power alone. You need a weight that is heavy enough to necessitate proper form but not so heavy you can't do it correctly.

The thing about women and squats that doctor said is such ridiculous nonsense! Women will be MORE prone to knee problems from ANYTHING because of the alignment of the pelvis and knees. It has nothing to do with low center of gravity. For sure doctors, as I've said time and again, don't know any more than the average person about this stuff. It can be very frustrating.

If I had a dime for every moderately active woman I've known who's had knee surgery I'd have fifty cents . Which is a lot if you think about it.

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Old 08-19-2007, 06:28 PM   #7
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I was thinking about what your saying about having correct form. Really you won't know unless there is someone that understands the lift and is watching you. I agree its more of a mental part than anything and any normal person who performs the lift will think they are doing it right.

You said lifting with your shoulders is a main key to this exercise. I sometimes find myself pushing with my heels half way then the other half with the assistance of my upper body.

Now what I try to do is keep the bar on the upper part of my shoulders then decend relaxing my body and letting the weight drop to the desired depth and lift with everything i got. Now when the weight is gets heavier thats when that half feet/upper body process kicks in to get the lift done.

Not sure if thats all correct or what not but I know something im doing is affecting my feet. Although the last couple of days has been better than it used to be.
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Old 08-19-2007, 06:46 PM   #8
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Well a couple of things I notice in those comments. At no time should your relax your body or let the weight "drop". It should be tight and under control at all times. This could actually change the lift a bunch because letting you body relax could mean relaxing the lower back and others putting you at a disadvantage and forcing you to adopt a form that is less than effective if not outright bad.

It almost sounds like you have halves to the lift and perhaps your shoulders are dropping/coming forward at the beginning of the lift where you "push with the feet" and then you finish the lift as basically a goodmorning. That would mean that your hips rise first while your shouders don't and then it's finished using lower back flexion. Not good. I'm not sure if that is what you are saying of course it's just what it sounds like. If it is so it would be a pretty typical and common problem.

If this is what is happening I have another post I can refer you to. But in any case try the change I suggested above.

Again, I can't really say exactly what might be happening to your feet. This kind of problem tends to have a chain connected to it meaning you could trace a line of imbalances all the way up from the feet to the shoulders or vice versa.
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Old 08-19-2007, 07:12 PM   #9
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On the thing about not being able to tell if your are having correct form I wanted to clear that up a little. You are absolutely right that most people will assume they are doing it right of course but on the major points of form you certainly can figure out the right way of doing it if you are willing to do it.

Basically what I was saying about not being able to correct form because of faciliation/inhibition in a GENERAL sense has a lot to do with the weight you are using. Basically if you have an imbalance it will rear it's ugly head once the load is heavy enough. If the load is light enough it is quite possible, and is usually the case, that the imbalance won't come into play so that you can conciously work on correct form.

Sometimes with relatively minor problems all you need to do is lighten the weight and build it back up. Expecially since a lot of the problems are caused by starting too heavy in the first place and exaccerbating whatever minor imbalances were there. So just taking the time to progress slowly while learning and maintaing proper form can make a huge difference.

But in a more SPECIFIC sense I was talking about something like over-pronation. It could be the problem comes from these imbalances like I talked about before so that just lightening the weight and learing correct form and all that would solve the problem or it could be that you are a person who habitually overpronates. Meaning you do it when your walk or whenever. And in that case just learning proper squat form ain't going to help. Because if your can't do everyday activities without overpronating you certainly ain't going to squat weight without doing it.

Probably though your problem is not that severe and you can correct it. I don't know for sure of course HOW you can do that but if you are having problems with form then lighten the weight to one where you can nail it.
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Old 08-22-2007, 04:16 PM   #10
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After reading this I am kinda questioning my own form. I really wish I had someone who knew what the hell they were doing to evaluate my form. Maybe I can get someone to record a short video of me squatting sometime.

About squat shoes...I had ankle surgery earlier this year and decided to buy a pair of lifting shoes and I spent around 80 bucks for them on amazon.com and they are working very well for me. I posted a picture of them in someones journal, but I cant remember who it was off the top of my head.

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