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Why does muscle growth slow down or stop?

Training discussion on Why does muscle growth slow down or stop?, within the Bodybuilding Forum; continued: This type of training contributes little to maximal strength while it does increase strength endurance due to mitochondria hypertrophy. ...


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Old 02-10-2006, 01:51 PM   #11
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This type of training contributes little to maximal strength while it does increase strength endurance due to mitochondria hypertrophy. Growth of connective tissue is also present with sarcoplasmic hypertrophy.
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Myofibrillar hypertrophy occurs due to increases in the number of myosin/actin filaments (sarcomeres) inside the cell. This leads to increased strength and size of the contractile unit of muscle.

Ultimately this means greater force production. This is often referred to as functional muscle, while sarcoplasmic hypertrophy is referred to as non-functional muscle. ATP and Muscular Growth As we said earlier, increasing the number of mitochondria in the cell means increased ATP production.

ATP is required for protein synthesis to occur. Low levels of ATP will halt muscular growth as well as inhibit other metabolic functions that take place inside the muscle cell. Siff and Verkhoshansky have shown that it is possible to increase your muscles contractile unit faster than the mitochondria’s ability to compensate for this growth. When actin/myosin filaments out grow the number of mitochondria, growth of elements besides the sarcomere is inhibited. The insufficient quantity of ATP results in the bodies inability to promote protein synthesis.

Size vs. Strength

In general, bodybuilders are more muscular than powerlifters, but powerlifters are stronger.

How does training with weights that are 90% of 1RM develop strength and power, but do very little for hypertrophy?

Studies have shown an intense set of 5 reps involves more fibers than an intense set of 1rep. Research has shown that using loads in the 90% range causes failure to occur before a growth stimulus has been sent to the cells. Therefore other factors besides muscle fiber fatigue result in termination of the set. The muscle simply does not have sufficient time under tension to stimulate the growth process. High rep training produces high levels of phosphate and hydrogen Ions which enhance the growth process.


Research has shown heavy lifting enhances neural efficiency ( improved motor recruitment, and firing rates) which enhances strength , but does not necessarily result in muscular growth.

With this information you can see why the strength, and size levels are different between bodybuilders and powerlifters. There are powerlifters that possess muscularity comparable to bodybuilders. There are also bodybuilders who have equal or greater strength than powerlifters. Do not misinterpret this article to mean there is no relationship between strength and size. If you gain 30lbs. of lean tissue you will probably become stronger. The basic idea presented in this article is there is a relationship between size and strength , but strength increases can occur due to other reasons. Just as size increase can occur with a non-linear strength increase.

References
The Weight Trainer(2001)
Muscle Growth part 1811: Why, And How Does A Muscle Grow and Get Stronger?
http://weightrainer.virtualave.net/
training/growth/.html

Zatsiorsky,V.(1995) Science
and Practice of Strength
Training. Human Kinetics.
Reexamining the Sarcopenia Hypothesis: Muscle Mass versus Muscle Strength

M. VISSER, A. B. NEWMAN, M. C. NEVITT, S. B. KRITCHEVSKY E. B. STAMM,B. H. GOODPASTER and T. B. HARRIS FOR THE HEALTH, AGING, AND BODY COMPOSITION STUDY RESEARCH GROUP

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The association of muscle mass and muscle strength with lower-extremity performance, as measured by timed repeated chair stands, was investigated using preliminary data from 3,075 Black and White participants (70-79 years old) in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. Leg muscle mass (LM) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 4500). The maximal isokinetic torque of the leg extensors (LS) was measured at 60°/s using a Kin-Com isokinetic dynamometer. Men were stronger, had greater LM, and better performance than women. As expected, low LS was associated with poorer performance after adjusting for race, study site, and body fat. Low LM was associated with poorer performance in men and women, with a potential threshold effect in women only. When LS and LM were modeled simultaneously, only LS remained independently associated with performance. In conclusion, muscle strength, but not muscle mass, is independently associated with lower-extremity performance.

Last edited by EricT; 02-10-2006 at 07:18 PM..

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If you act sanctimonious I will just list out your logical fallacies until you get pissed off and spew blasphemous remarks.
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Old 02-10-2006, 02:00 PM   #12
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One trick is to adjust the diet by consuming more quality protein and calories every time you increase your strength levels by about 5%.
See above. Depending on your training your strenth could increase without an appreciable increase in muscle mass. This is why we go by lean body mass other more dependable and accurate guidelines such as basal metabolism rate to determine nutrient needs.

That is not to say that pure strength athletes do not need higher protein intake!

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For maximum effects around 30 grams of high quality protein must be supplied every 3 hours in order to keep the body’s amino acid pool topped up full.
This is the only information given as to how much protein is needed. Someone with an lbm of 140 probably get enough if he ate 7 meals a day. Again, not a good formula.

Last edited by EricT; 02-10-2006 at 07:24 PM..
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Old 02-10-2006, 07:24 PM   #13
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aahh...

see, i firstly didn't read the post fully coz i got bored mi-way...

next, i presumed the first 5 lines to be true and therefore, the entire post is true....

now, when i open this post and read it for the first time... your right eric:

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Originally Posted by Eric3237
So much of this is just common sense (that's okay, I guess); much of it is dead wrong.
and muscle size is NOT proportional to strength AT ALL...!

forget HST, we have a live example of someone like that right here: me..!
i'm like 170 lbs @ 5'7.... waist 31", chest 42"... and i deadlift what... 130 kgs..!!!
next, look at dave... as per what he's been saying he isnt big AT ALL... but if you notice his lifts in his journal... you'll see that he can DEFINITELY hold his own...
lastly, lets look at 0311... the guys HUGE @ 5'9... AND he's strong...
so, whats being proven here?: size is NOT proportional to strength...

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Originally Posted by 0311
Wanting, did that post come from somewhere like xtrememass.com??
ha ha ha ha ha aha ha aha ha

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Old 02-11-2006, 11:48 AM   #14
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lol my post got ripped to peices and to answer your question of where I got it I can't find out my history only works for 2 days so it deleted the site. Uhm sorry about the post being so inaccurate but it gave you guys something to do. I don't know as much as some of you on this so some of it made sense to me and i beleived that the article was true then.
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Old 02-11-2006, 12:07 PM   #15
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Thumbs up

Speaking for myself, Wanting, I was only ripping up the article, not you. Next time, though, you might want to provide your source.

But this kind of thing is what the site is all about, and it's a good learning experience.
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Old 02-11-2006, 08:24 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WantingMuscle7
Uhm sorry about the post being so inaccurate but it gave you guys something to do. I don't know as much as some of you on this so some of it made sense to me and i beleived that the article was true then.
no problem and you dont need to apologoze.... the post was good because the discussion that followd it weill help others find out the real truth...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric3237
Speaking for myself, Wanting, I was only ripping up the article, not you. Next time, though, you might want to provide your source.
yes, please provide your source next time... and i don think anyone meant to rip YOU... but yes, the article got ruined..

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Originally Posted by Eric3237
But this kind of thing is what the site is all about, and it's a good learning experience.
that it is... that it is...
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Old 02-12-2006, 08:14 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by ashimmatthan
and muscle size is NOT proportional to strength AT ALL...!
Well, let's not go too far. Gotta watch those absolute statements. I had stated that it is not always directly related. Strength gains through other adaptations can only go so far. For instance, neural efficiency can only increase so much before more muscle has to be called into play in order for strength to continue increasing.

In other words, you can gain muscle without gaining a proportionate amount of strength, but you can't continue to gain strength without eventually gainig more muscle.

While trying to banish one myth, let's not created another ;) .
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Old 02-12-2006, 08:19 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric3237
While trying to banish one myth, let's not created another ;) .

ha ha ha

no, but have you ever noticed some really really really thin guy who looks like a pile of sticks with only bones walking into a gym and benching like 300 lbs with ease...?

i have and its shocked me to the core..! :eek:
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Old 02-12-2006, 08:28 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by ashimmatthan
no, but have you ever noticed some really really really thin guy who looks like a pile of sticks with only bones walking into a gym and benching like 300 lbs with ease...?
Oh, absolutely. I am not debating that kind of phenomenom at all. Some people have great natural strength. And it's even possible that that person could increase his strength without noticing substantial muscle growth. We've established that.

What I am talking about is the limits of strength increase without substantial muscle growth. If a really skinny guy can already bench 300 with ease, I don't think you'll often see that guy increasing that strength considerably without more muscle. Let's not forget that it is the muscle that, in the end, is doing the work!

Quote:
There are powerlifters that possess muscularity comparable to bodybuilders. There are also bodybuilders who have equal or greater strength than powerlifters. Do not misinterpret this article to mean there is no relationship between strength and size. If you gain 30lbs. of lean tissue you will probably become stronger. The basic idea presented in this article is there is a relationship between size and strength , but strength increases can occur due to other reasons. Just as size increase can occur with a non-linear strength increase.

Last edited by EricT; 02-12-2006 at 08:40 AM..
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Old 02-12-2006, 08:32 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric3237
Oh, absolutely. I am not debating that kind of phenomenom at all. Some people have great natural strength. And it's even possible that that person could increase his strength without noticing substantial muscle growth. We've established that.

What I am talking about is the limits of strength increase without substantial muscle growth. If a really skinny guy can already bench 300 with ease, I don't think you'll often see that guy increasing that strength considerably without more muscle. Let's not forget that it is the muscle that, in the end, is doing the work!
point noted sir..
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