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Old 03-20-2008, 06:44 PM
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Question Chains?

I heard chains help with bench press and squats but dose anyone know if they help w/deads
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Old 03-20-2008, 06:50 PM
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They do. Bands also work well.
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Old 03-20-2008, 06:51 PM
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what r bands?
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Old 03-20-2008, 06:56 PM
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Basically a big elastic band.
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Old 03-20-2008, 06:58 PM
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o, do u strap them on the end of the barbell or somthin
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Old 03-20-2008, 07:10 PM
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It depends on what you want out of them. You can use them to take weight off the bar in the lower ROM (bands loop under the bar, bands attached above the bar) or you can use them to increase resistance at upper ROM (bands loop over bar, bands attached below bar).

I know this sounds like the same thing but it isnt exactly. For the lower ROM your taking weight off the bar and eventually lifting the weight of the bar alone (at full lockout). For the upper ROM you're using the resistance of the band to "increase the weight (or resistance)" of the bar. Pulling an elastic is harder then letting an elastic pull. (if that even makes sense )
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Old 03-20-2008, 07:11 PM
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sounds good
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Old 03-21-2008, 08:56 AM
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Pulling an elastic is harder then letting an elastic pull...

Unless you can explain that one a little more clearly to me then I'm going to say I disagree.

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Old 03-21-2008, 09:09 AM
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You asked for it...

Some polymers display a nonlinear elastic behaviour. Meaning that on the stress strain curve it does not 'unload' along the same path as it was 'loaded'. The loading curve is typically sharper or steeper and therefore has a higher stiffness (requires more force to displace or stretch it) and the unloading curve is typically shallower, therefore having a lower stiffness (requires less force to displace or shrink it).

There are some that will exhibit perfect linear elastic behaviour (meaning they load and unload along the same line) and will be the same in either direction. So I should have said that for some kinds of elastics pulling it is harder than letting it pull.
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Old 03-21-2008, 09:22 AM
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ill stick with the simpler explination
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